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Increasing reproducibility and interpretability of microbiota-gut-brain studies on human neurocognition and intermediary microbial metabolites

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 July 2019

Esther Aarts
Affiliation:
Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, 6525 EN Nijmegen, The Netherlands. esther.aarts@donders.ru.nlwww.ru.nl/donders/pac/fac
Sahar El Aidy
Affiliation:
Department of Molecular Immunology and Microbiology, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute, University of Groningen, 9747 AG Groningen, The Netherlandssahar.elaidy@rug.nlhttps://www.rug.nl/research/microbial-physiology/el-aidy-group/

Abstract

In this commentary, we point to guidelines for performing human neuroimaging studies and their reporting in microbiota-gut-brain (MGB) articles. Moreover, we provide a view on interpretational issues in MGB studies, with a specific focus on gut microbiota–derived metabolites. Thus, extending the target article, we provide recommendations to the field to increase reproducibility and relevance of this type of MGB study.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2019 

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References

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