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Toward an evolutionary basis for resilience to drug addiction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 November 2011

Serge H. Ahmed
Affiliation:
Université Bordeaux Ségalen, Institut des Maladies Neurodégénératives, UMR CNRS 5293, 33076 Bordeaux, France. sahmed@u-bordeaux2.frhttp://imn-bordeaux.org

Abstract

According to Müller & Schumann (M&S), people would have evolved adaptations for learning to use psychoactive plants and drugs as instruments that reveal particularly advantageous in modern urban environments. Here I “instrumentalize” this framework to propose an evolutionary basis for the existence of a biological resilience to drug addiction in people.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

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References

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