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Ultrasociality: When institutions make a difference

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 June 2016

Petr Houdek
Affiliation:
Faculty of Social and Economic Studies, J. E. Purkyne University in Usti nad Labem, CZ-40096 Usti nad Labem, Czech Republicpetr.houdek@gmail.comstastnyd2@gmail.comhttp://;web.natur.cuni.cz/~houdek3/ Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, CZ-12808 Prague 2, Czech Republicjulie.novakova@gmail.comhttps://www.julienovakova.com/ Faculty of Business Administration, University of Economics, Prague, CZ-130 67 Prague 3, Czech Republic
Julie Novakova
Affiliation:
Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, CZ-12808 Prague 2, Czech Republicjulie.novakova@gmail.comhttps://www.julienovakova.com/
Dan Stastny
Affiliation:
Faculty of Social and Economic Studies, J. E. Purkyne University in Usti nad Labem, CZ-40096 Usti nad Labem, Czech Republicpetr.houdek@gmail.comstastnyd2@gmail.comhttp://;web.natur.cuni.cz/~houdek3/ University of New York in Prague, CZ-120 00 Prague 2, Czech Republic.

Abstract

We present arguments that the analogy between humans and social insects is coincidental, rather than based upon real similarities. In their claims, Gowdy & Krall largely omit the role of institutions in the formation of complex societies, warfare, and regulation. They also offer no strong explanation for the expansion of agriculture despite its early detrimental effects except the “mistake hypothesis” (cf. Diamond 1987).

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

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