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Competences Required for the Delivery of High and Low-Intensity Cognitive Behavioural Interventions for Chronic Fatigue, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/ME and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

  • Katharine A. Rimes (a1), Janet Wingrove (a2), Rona Moss-Morris (a1) and Trudie Chalder (a1)

Abstract

Background: Cognitive behavioural interventions are effective in the treatment of chronic fatigue, chronic fatigue syndrome (sometimes known as ME or CFS/ME) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Such interventions are increasingly being provided not only in specialist settings but in primary care settings such as Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services. There are no existing competences for the delivery of “low-intensity” or “high-intensity” cognitive behavioural interventions for these conditions. Aims: To develop “high-intensity” and “low-intensity” competences for cognitive behavioural interventions for chronic fatigue, CFS/ME and IBS. Method: The initial draft drew on a variety of sources including treatment manuals and other information from randomized controlled trials. Therapists with experience in providing cognitive behavioural interventions for CF, CFS/ME and IBS in research and clinical settings were consulted on the initial draft competences and their suggestions for minor amendments were incorporated into the final versions. Results: Feedback from experienced therapists was positive. Therapists providing low intensity interventions reported that the competences were also helpful in highlighting training needs. Conclusions: These sets of competences should facilitate the training and supervision of therapists providing cognitive behavioural interventions for chronic fatigue, CFS/ME and IBS. The competences are available online (see table of contents for this issue: http://journals.cambridge.org/jid_BCP) or on request from the first author.

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Corresponding author

Reprint requests to Katharine A. Rimes, King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Department of Psychology, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK. E-mail: katharine.rimes@kcl.ac.uk

References

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Burgess, M. and Chalder, T. (2005). Overcoming Chronic Fatigue. London: Constable Robinson.
Castell, B. D., Kazantzis, N. and Moss-Morris, R. E. (2011). Cognitive behavioral therapy and graded exercise for chronic fatigue syndrome: a meta-analysis. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 18, 311324.
Chalder, T. (2003). Coping with Chronic Fatigue. London: Sheldon Press.
Kennedy, T., Jones, R., Darnley, S., Seed, P., Wessely, S. and Chalder, T. (2005). Cognitive behaviour therapy in addition to antispasmodic treatment for irritable bowel syndrome in primary care: randomised controlled trial. British Medical Journal, 331, 435.
Moss-Morris, R., McAlpine, L., Didsbury, L. P. and Spence, M. J. (2010). A randomized controlled trial of a cognitive behavioural therapy-based self-management intervention for irritable bowel syndrome in primary care. Psychological Medicine, 40, 8594.
National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (2007). Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (or encephalopathy): diagnosis and management of CFS/ME in adults and children. London: NICE. http://guidance.nice.org.uk/CG053.
Ridsdale, L., Godfrey, E., Chalder, T., Seed, P., King, M., Wallace, P., et al. (2001). Chronic fatigue in general practice: is counselling as good as cognitive behaviour therapy? A UK randomised trial. British Journal of General Practice, 51, 1924.
Roth, A. D. and Pilling, S. (2007). Competencies Required to Deliver Effective Cognitive and Behaviour Therapy for People with Depression and with Anxiety Disorders. London: HMSO, Department of Health.
Surawy, C., Hackmann, A., Hawton, K. and Sharpe, M. (1995). Chronic fatigue syndrome: a cognitive approach. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 33, 535544.
van Kessel, K., Moss-Morris, R., Willoughby, E., Chalder, T., Johnson, M. H. and Robinson, E. (2008). A randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavior therapy for multiple sclerosis fatigue. Psychosomatic Medicine, 70, 205213.
Wessley, S., David, A., Butler, S. and Chalder, T. (1989). Management of chronic (post-viral) fatigue syndrome. Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners, 39, 2629.
White, P., Goldsmith, K., Johnson, A., Potts, L., Walwyn, R., Decesare, J., et al. (2011). Comparison of Adaptive Pacing Therapy, Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, Graded Exercise Therapy, and Specialist Medical Care for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (PACE): a randomised trial. Lancet, 377, 823836.
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Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy
  • ISSN: 1352-4658
  • EISSN: 1469-1833
  • URL: /core/journals/behavioural-and-cognitive-psychotherapy
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Competences Required for the Delivery of High and Low-Intensity Cognitive Behavioural Interventions for Chronic Fatigue, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/ME and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

  • Katharine A. Rimes (a1), Janet Wingrove (a2), Rona Moss-Morris (a1) and Trudie Chalder (a1)
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