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Tomorrow's world: current developments in the therapeutic use of technology for psychosis

  • Puffn O'Hanlon, Golnar Aref-Adib, Andres Fonseca, Brynmor Lloyd-Evans, David Osborn and Sonia Johnson...

Summary

There is now an established evidence base for the use of information and communication technology (ICT) to support mental healthcare (‘e-mental health’) for common mental health problems. Recently, there have been significant developments in the therapeutic use of computers, mobile phones, gaming and virtual reality technologies for the assessment and treatment of psychosis. We provide an overview of the therapeutic use of ICT for psychosis, drawing on searches of the scientific literature and the internet and using interviews with experts in the field. We outline interventions that are already relevant to clinical practice, some that may become available in the foreseeable future and emerging challenges for their implementation.

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Copyright

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

Corresponding author

Puffin O'Hanlon, University College London, UCL Division of Psychiatry, 6th Floor, Maple House, 149 Tottenham Court Road, London W1T 7NF, UK. Email: p.hanlon@ucl.ac.uk

Footnotes

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See commentary, pp. 311–312, this issue.

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) licence.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

• Appreciate the potential uses of technology in the management of psychosis

• Understand the current evidence base for the use of technology in the management of psychosis

• Be aware of challenges involved in the development, evaluation and implementation of technology-based interventions for psychosis

DECLARATION OF INTEREST

P. O'H. is lead researcher, and S. J. and D. O. are joint chief investigators, on the ARIES study, a development and evaluation study of a self-management smartphone app for early intervention services. A. F. is CEO of an IT company creating digital therapeutics and diagnostics for mental health conditions.

Footnotes

References

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Tomorrow's world: current developments in the therapeutic use of technology for psychosis

  • Puffn O'Hanlon, Golnar Aref-Adib, Andres Fonseca, Brynmor Lloyd-Evans, David Osborn and Sonia Johnson...
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