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Cognitive–behavioural therapy by psychiatric trainees: can a little knowledge be a good thing?

  • Eric Kelleher (a1) (a2) (a3), Melissa Hayde (a2), Yvonne Tone (a1) (a2) (a4), Iulia Dud (a2), Colette Kearns (a1) (a2), Mary McGoldrick (a1) (a2) and Michael McDonough (a1) (a2)...
Abstract
Aims and method

To establish the competency of psychiatric trainees in delivering cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) to selected cases, following introductory lectures and supervision. Supervisor reports of trainees rotating through a national psychiatric hospital over 8.5 years were reviewed along with revised Cognitive Therapy Scale (CTS-R) ratings where available. Independent t-test was used to compare variables.

Results

Structured supervision reports were available for 52 of 55 (95%) trainees. The mean result (4.6, s.d. = 0.9) was at or above the accepted level for competency (≥3) for participating trainees. Available CTS-R ratings (n = 22) supported the supervisor report findings for those particular trainees.

Clinical implications

This study indicates that trainees under supervision can provide meaningful clinical interventions when delivering CBT to selected cases. The costs of supervision need to be judged against these clinical gains.

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Copyright
This is an open-access article published by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Eric Kelleher (eric.kelleher@tcd.ie)
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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Cognitive–behavioural therapy by psychiatric trainees: can a little knowledge be a good thing?

  • Eric Kelleher (a1) (a2) (a3), Melissa Hayde (a2), Yvonne Tone (a1) (a2) (a4), Iulia Dud (a2), Colette Kearns (a1) (a2), Mary McGoldrick (a1) (a2) and Michael McDonough (a1) (a2)...
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