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Drug information update. Unconventional treatment strategies for schizophrenia: Polypharmacy and heroic dosing

  • Bret A. Moore (a1), Debbi A. Morrissette (a2), Jonathan M. Meyer (a3) and Stephen M. Stahl (a2) (a4)
Summary

The majority of patients respond to antipsychotic monotherapy at standard doses, but a subset of patients will require more heroic measures that include antipsychotic polypharmacy and high-dose monotherapy. Indeed, research has shown that roughly 30% of patients with psychosis are prescribed multiple antipsychotic medications. We discuss the potential benefits and challenges of these approaches and provide a rationale for why and when they should be utilised.

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Copyright
This is an open-access article published by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Stephen M. Stahl (smstahl@neiglobal.com)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

J.M.M. reports speaking or advising fees from Acadia Pharmaceuticals, Alkermes, Forum Pharmaceuticals, Merck, Otsuka America, Inc., Sunovion Pharmaceuticals and Teva Pharmaceutical Industries. S.M.S. has served as a consultant for Acadia, BioMarin, EnVivo Pharmaceuticals, Forum Pharmaceuticals, Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Orexigen Therapeutics, Otsuka, Pamlab, Servier, Shire, Sprout, Taisho Pharmaceutical, Takeda and Trius Therapeutics; as an Advisory Board Member for BioMarin, EnVivo, Forum, Genomind, Lundbeck, Otsuka, RCT Logic and Shire; on the Speakers Bureau for Forum, Takeda, Servier and Sunovion UK; and he has received research and/or grant support from Alkermes, Clintara, Eli Lilly, Forest Laboratories, Forum, Genomind, JayMac Pharmaceuticals, Jazz, Merck, Novartis, Otsuka, Pamlab, Pfizer, Servier, Shire, Sprout, Sunovion, Sunovion UK, Takeda, Teva and Tonix.

Footnotes
References
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Drug information update. Unconventional treatment strategies for schizophrenia: Polypharmacy and heroic dosing

  • Bret A. Moore (a1), Debbi A. Morrissette (a2), Jonathan M. Meyer (a3) and Stephen M. Stahl (a2) (a4)
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