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Evaluating the effects of a peer-led suturing and wound management workshop for doctors working in a psychiatric hospital

  • T. A. Buick (a1), D. Hamilton (a2), G. Weatherdon (a2), C. I. O'Shea (a3) and G. McAlpine (a4)...
Abstract
Background

Psychiatric in-patients are often transferred to an emergency department for care of minor wounds, incurring significant distress to the patient and cost to the service.

Aims

To improve superficial wound management in psychiatric in-patients and reduce transfers to the emergency department.

Method

Thirty-four trainees attended two peer-led suturing and wound management teaching sessions, and a suturing kit box was compiled and stored at the Royal Edinburgh Hospital. Teaching was evaluated using Kirkpatrick's model, and patient transfer numbers were acquired by reviewing in-patient Datix reports and emergency department case notes for 6 months before and after teaching.

Results

The proportion of patients transferred to the emergency department decreased significantly from 90% 6 months before the workshop to 30% 6 months after (P < 0.05). Trainees engaged positively and there was a significant increase in self-confidence rating following the workshop (P < 0.05). The estimated cost saving per transfer was £183.76.

Conclusion

The combination of a peer-led workshop and on-site suturing kit box was effective in reducing transfers to the emergency department and provided a substantial cost saving.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to T.A. Buick (tbuick@nhs.net)
References
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Evaluating the effects of a peer-led suturing and wound management workshop for doctors working in a psychiatric hospital

  • T. A. Buick (a1), D. Hamilton (a2), G. Weatherdon (a2), C. I. O'Shea (a3) and G. McAlpine (a4)...
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