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Little evidence for community treatment orders – a battle fought with heavy weapons

  • Reinhard Heun (a1), Subodh Dave (a1) and Paul Rowlands (a1)
Summary

This editorial discusses the pros and cons of community treatment orders (CTOs) from the perspective of community general adult psychiatry. There is little scientific evidence supporting the application of CTOs. Preconditions of a CTO to work are likely to be met by few patients. The time for the application of a CTO may be better spent for patient-centred care until there is sufficient new and robust evidence that identifies the patients that might profit.

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Copyright
This is an open-access article published by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Reinhard Heun (reinhard.heun@derbyshcft.nhs.uk)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

R.H., S.D. and P.R. are members of the Executive Committee of the Faculty of General Adult Psychiatry of the Royal College of Psychiatrists.

Footnotes
References
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Little evidence for community treatment orders – a battle fought with heavy weapons

  • Reinhard Heun (a1), Subodh Dave (a1) and Paul Rowlands (a1)
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