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Psychiatry trainees' experiences of cognitive-behavioural therapy training in a UK deanery: A qualitative analysis

  • Amy Alice Carson (a1) and Sarah Emily Clark (a1)
Abstract
Aims and method

To explore core psychiatry trainees' experiences of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) training by using interpretative phenomenological analysis of semi-structured interviews conducted with seven core trainee psychiatrists in Yorkshire and the Humber Deanery.

Results

Four key themes emerged: (1) barriers to training; (2) guidance, with emphasis on the importance of supervision groups; (3) acquisition of new skills and confidence; (4) personal influence on the training experience.

Clinical implications

Many trainees in Yorkshire have a positive experience of CBT training; however, some also experience barriers to acquiring the relevant skills. Further research should build on the positive factors and barriers identified here, with a view to guiding improvements in training nationwide.

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Copyright
This is an open-access article published by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Sarah Emily Clark (sarahemilyclark@doctors.org.uk)
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 2056-4694
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Psychiatry trainees' experiences of cognitive-behavioural therapy training in a UK deanery: A qualitative analysis

  • Amy Alice Carson (a1) and Sarah Emily Clark (a1)
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