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Rethinking self-injury recovery: a commentary and conceptual reframing

  • Stephen P. Lewis (a1) and Penelope A. Hasking (a2)

Abstract

Summary

A growing body of research has focused on understanding what may contribute to cessation of self-injury. Although these efforts are of value, cessation represents just one component of self-injury recovery. Exclusive or primary focus on cessation may foster unrealistic expectations for those with lived experience of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Accordingly, this commentary discusses the importance of expanding the concept of NSSI recovery beyond cessation in both research and clinical domains. We conclude by presenting a person-centred and non-stigmatising conceptual reframing of recovery.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Stephen P. Lewis (stephen.lewis@uoguelph.ca)

References

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Rethinking self-injury recovery: a commentary and conceptual reframing

  • Stephen P. Lewis (a1) and Penelope A. Hasking (a2)
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