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Should psychiatrists write fiction?

  • Henry Bladon (a1)
Summary

This paper looks at the relationship between fiction and psychiatry. Specifically, the idea of psychiatrists as fiction writers is explored, and reference is made to various fictional texts to illustrate the problems of stigma and negative imagery. These two main areas of focus are highlighted as ones that the practice of writing fiction might address, and some potential pitfalls are discussed. The paper suggests how psychiatrists might ameliorate the present problems by incorporating their unique clinical skills and knowledge into fictional narratives.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Henry Bladon (hxb455@bham.ac.uk)
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 2056-4694
  • EISSN: 2056-4708
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Should psychiatrists write fiction?

  • Henry Bladon (a1)
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