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‘Spirituality’ and ‘cultural adaptation’ in a Latino mutual aid group for substance misuse and mental health

  • Brian T. Anderson (a1) and Angela Garcia (a2)
Summary

A previously unknown Spanish-language mutual aid resource for substance use and mental health concerns is available in Latino communities across the USA and much of Latin America. This kind of ‘4th and 5th step’ group is a ‘culturally adapted’ version of the 12-step programme and provides empirical grounds on which to re-theorise the importance of spirituality and culture in mutual aid recovery groups. This article presents ethnographic data on this organisation.

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Copyright
This is an open-access article published by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Brian T. Anderson (brian.anderson@ucsf.edu)
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 2056-4694
  • EISSN: 2056-4708
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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‘Spirituality’ and ‘cultural adaptation’ in a Latino mutual aid group for substance misuse and mental health

  • Brian T. Anderson (a1) and Angela Garcia (a2)
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