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Borderline personality disorder: patterns of self-harm, reported childhood trauma and clinical outcome

  • Mark Andrew McFetridge (a1), Rebecca Milner (a2), Victoria Gavin (a3) and Liat Levita (a4)
Summary

Consecutive admissions of 214 women with borderline personality disorder were investigated for patterns of specific forms of self-harm and reported developmental experiences. Systematic examination of clinical notes found that 75% had previously reported a history of childhood sexual abuse. These women were more likely to self-harm, and in specific ways that may reflect their past experiences. Despite this, treatment within a dialectical behaviour therapy-informed therapeutic community leads to relatively greater clinical gains than for those without a reported sexual abuse trauma history. Notably, greater behavioural and self-reported distress and dissociation were not found to predict poor clinical outcome.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Mark Andrew McFetridge, The Acorn Programme, The Retreat, Heslington Road, York YO10 5BN, UK. Email: mmcfetridge@theretreatyork.org.uk
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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2 Herman, J. Trauma and Recovery. New York: Basic Books; 1997.
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BJPsych Open
  • ISSN: -
  • EISSN: 2056-4724
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-open
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Borderline personality disorder: patterns of self-harm, reported childhood trauma and clinical outcome

  • Mark Andrew McFetridge (a1), Rebecca Milner (a2), Victoria Gavin (a3) and Liat Levita (a4)
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