Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7f7b94f6bd-8mfwn Total loading time: 0.327 Render date: 2022-06-29T18:25:19.443Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Article contents

Experience and Reflection From Inpatient Staff at an Intellectual Disability Hospital During COVID-19

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 June 2022

Rahul Malhotra
Affiliation:
Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board, Bangor, United Kingdom
Zeenish Azhar*
Affiliation:
Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board, Bangor, United Kingdom
*
*Presenting author.
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.
Aims

The COVID-19 pandemic and the associated impact on the NHS led to particular challenges for Intellectual Disability (ID) inpatient hospitals across the country. The aim of this Research Project is to gather the experience of Inpatient staff in our local ID Hospital following the first wave of COVID-19 pandemic in July 2020.

Methods

We gathered data by means of survey from inpatient staff including ‘staff nurses’ and ‘health care support workers’ from 2 cute assessment and treatment units and 1 rehabilitation unit over the preceding 3 months. We obtained 15 responses. We gathered quantitative data via a questionnaire on the views of staff regarding the service provision for patients and staff during COVID-19. We also gathered qualitative data on learning points and how things would have been done differently in hindsight.

Results

The responses were anonymised, directly transcribed, coded and grouped into themes. 67% of staff stated appropriate type and quantity of Personal Protective Equipment was available. 60% of staff stated it was ‘easy’ to access a General Practitioner for patient reviews. 60% of staff stated, there was a change in arrangements for Do Not Resuscitate/Escalation plans during COVID-19. 47% of staff stated there was availability of virtual or face-to-face clinical training support. 67% of staff did not take sickness leave due to symptoms or contact with a COVID-19 patient. 67% of staff did not receive or found it difficult to access a COVID-19 test. 47% of staff reported a negative impact of the pandemic on their physical and mental health well being. 13% of staff found the Counselling/emotional Support helpful.

Some of the key themes that emerged in the qualitative data analysis included the importance of being grateful for personal health and well being, move lives could be saved if earlier and more frequent testing was available during the first wave, delays in the arrival of PPE in the hospital and ideas to mitigate risk by designating members of staff to a fixed work area to reduce mixing.

Conclusion

A wide range of reflections, suggestions and feedback were obtained during the research project which will be helpful to plan and organise services moving forward should future waves of COVID-19 emerge.

Type
Research
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Royal College of Psychiatrists
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.
You have Access Open access

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Experience and Reflection From Inpatient Staff at an Intellectual Disability Hospital During COVID-19
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Experience and Reflection From Inpatient Staff at an Intellectual Disability Hospital During COVID-19
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Experience and Reflection From Inpatient Staff at an Intellectual Disability Hospital During COVID-19
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *