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The therapeutic needs of psychiatric in-patients with psychosis: A qualitative exploration of patient and staff perspectives

  • Lisa Wood (a1), Claire Williams (a2), Jo Billings (a3) and Sonia Johnson (a4)

Abstract

Background

Concerns are recurrently expressed that the therapeutic content of in-patient care is limited and lacking clear guidance. The perspectives of patients and staff regarding therapeutic priorities for psychiatric in-patient care have been little explored and compared.

Aims

The aim of this study was to examine patient and staff perspectives on the care priorities of psychiatric in-patients with psychosis.

Method

We recruited 12 in-patients with psychosis and 12 multidisciplinary team staff. All participants undertook a semi-structured interview examining their perspectives on the therapeutic needs of people with psychosis during admission. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis conducted.

Results

Three superordinate themes arose from patient interviews: ‘the importance of considering social circumstances and trauma’, ‘managing the intra- and interpersonal impact of psychosis’ and ‘lack of control and collaboration in care’ and three from staff interviews: ‘multidisciplinary facilitators of care’, ‘treating complexity and incorporating social factors’ and ‘restrictive practices preventing quality care provision’. Comparison of patient and staff themes identified unmet needs in addressing social marginalisation, trauma and distress, and the importance of collaborative treatment process and inclusion of spirituality.

Conclusions

There are gaps between staff and patient perspectives on important priorities for in-patient care that may help explain persistent patient dissatisfaction with in-patient care. Findings suggest the need for coproduced work to develop and test interventions that address broader therapeutic priorities.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.

Corresponding author

Correspondence: Lisa Wood, Acute and Rehabilitation Directorate, Goodmayes Hospital, North East London NHS Foundation Trust, Barley Lane, Ilford IG3 8XJ, UK. Email: lisawood3@nhs.net

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The therapeutic needs of psychiatric in-patients with psychosis: A qualitative exploration of patient and staff perspectives

  • Lisa Wood (a1), Claire Williams (a2), Jo Billings (a3) and Sonia Johnson (a4)
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