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Absorption of lycopene from single or daily portions of raw and processed tomato

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

Marisa Porrini*
Affiliation:
Department of Food Science and Technology, Nutrition Section, University of Milan, via Celoria 2, 20133 Milan, Italy
Patrizia Riso
Affiliation:
Department of Food Science and Technology, Nutrition Section, University of Milan, via Celoria 2, 20133 Milan, Italy
Giulio Testolin
Affiliation:
Department of Food Science and Technology, Nutrition Section, University of Milan, via Celoria 2, 20133 Milan, Italy
*
*Corresponding author: Dr Marisa Porrini, fax +39 2 7063 8625, email porrini@imiucca.csi.unimi.it
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Abstract

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To study the relationship between lycopene intake and plasma concentration, ten healthy female subjects were given one or more portions of tomato purée or fresh raw tomato containing 16.5mg total lycopene (all-trans + cis forms). In Expt 1 subjects (n 9) were randomly assigned the single portions of the two tomato products and blood samples were collected to follow the change in plasma carotenoid concentrations within the first 12 h and on each of the following 5 d (104 h). In Expt 2 subjects (n 10) were divided into two groups of five each receiving daily dietary portions of tomato purée or fresh raw tomato containing 16.5mg total lycopene for 7 d. Fasting blood samples were collected daily. In Expt 1 the plasma total lycopene (all-trans + cis forms) concentration, after the single portions of tomato purée and raw tomato, varied significantly over time, with a first peak reached after 6 h, a further increase after 12 h and a slow decrease until 104 h. In Expt 2, when the tomato products were given daily, there was a day-by-day increase in the plasma total lycopene concentration, and through the following week of a diet without tomato there was a gradual decrease. However, values did not return to basal concentrations. Plasma total lycopene concentration was higher after the tomato purée intake than after the raw tomato in both the first (F (1,8) 7.597; P < 0.025) and the second experiments (F (1,8) 12.193; P < 0.01) demonstrating a significant effect of food matrix on absorption.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1998

References

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