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    Moreira, A. P. B. Teixeira, T. F. S. Alves, R. D. M. Peluzio, M. C. G. Costa, N. M. B. Bressan, J. Mattes, R. and Alfenas, R. C. G. 2016. Effect of a high-fat meal containing conventional or high-oleic peanuts on post-prandial lipopolysaccharide concentrations in overweight/obese men. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Vol. 29, Issue. 1, p. 95.


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Acute and second-meal effects of peanuts on glycaemic response and appetite in obese women with high type 2 diabetes risk: a randomised cross-over clinical trial

  • Caio E. G. Reis (a1), Daniela N. Ribeiro (a1), Neuza M. B. Costa (a2), Josefina Bressan (a1), Rita C. G. Alfenas (a1) and Richard D. Mattes (a3)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114512004217
  • Published online: 05 November 2012
Abstract

Nut consumption is associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of adding peanuts (whole or peanut butter) on first (0–240 min)- and second (240–490 min)-meal glucose metabolism and selected gut satiety hormone responses, appetite ratings and food intake in obese women with high T2DM risk. A group of fifteen women participated in a randomised cross-over clinical trial in which 42·5 g of whole peanuts without skins (WP), peanut butter (PB) or no peanuts (control) were added to a 75 g available carbohydrate-matched breakfast meal. Postprandial concentrations (0–490 min) of glucose, insulin, NEFA, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY), cholecystokinin (CCK), appetitive sensations and food intake were assessed after breakfast treatments and a standard lunch. Postprandial NEFA incremental AUC (IAUC) (0–240 min) and glucose IAUC (240–490 min) responses were lower for the PB breakfast compared with the control breakfast. Insulin concentrations were higher at 120 and 370 min after the PB consumption than after the control consumption. Desire-to-eat ratings were lower, while PYY, GLP-1 and CCK concentrations were higher after the PB intake compared with the control intake. WP led to similar but non-significant effects. The addition of PB to breakfast moderated postprandial glucose and NEFA concentrations, enhanced gut satiety hormone secretion and reduced the desire to eat. The greater bioaccessibility of the lipid component in PB is probably responsible for the observed incremental post-ingestive responses between the nut forms. Inclusion of PB, and probably WP, to breakfast may help to moderate glucose concentrations and appetite in obese women.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Caio E. G. Reis, fax +55 31 38992541, email caioedureis@gmail.com
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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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