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    Teng, Kim-Tiu Nagapan, Gowri Cheng, Hwee Ming and Nesaretnam, Kalanithi 2011. Palm Olein and Olive Oil Cause a Higher Increase in Postprandial Lipemia Compared with Lard but Had No Effect on Plasma Glucose, Insulin and Adipocytokines. Lipids, Vol. 46, Issue. 4, p. 381.


    Robinson, Lindsay E. Buchholz, Andrea C. and Mazurak, Vera C. 2007. Inflammation, obesity, and fatty acid metabolism: influence ofn-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on factors contributing to metabolic syndrome. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Vol. 32, Issue. 6, p. 1008.


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Acute postprandial effect of hydrogenated fish oil, palm oil and lard on plasma cholesterol, triacylglycerol and non-esterified fatty acid metabolism in normocholesterolaemic males

  • Marie M. Cantwell (a1) (a2) (a3), Mary A.T. Flynn (a1) (a2) (a4) and Michael J. Gibney (a2)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1079/BJN20051723
  • Published online: 01 March 2007
Abstract

The majority of research has focused on the association between trans unsaturated fatty acids (TUFA) from hydrogenated vegetable oils and heart disease even though TUFA are also produced from hydrogenated fish oil. We compared the acute effect of three solid fats on postprandial cholesterol, triacylglycerol (TAG) and NEFA concentrations in normocholesterolaemic males. Eight healthy male volunteers consumed each of the three 40g fat meals (partially hydrogenated fish oil (PHFO), palm oil and lard) in random order and blood samples were drawn at 2, 4, 6 and 8h thereafter for lipid analysis. The postprandial response in plasma TAG, TAG-rich lipoprotein-TAG (TRL-TAG), total cholesterol and plasma NEFA, measured as the area under the postprandial curve, was not significantly different between the three meals (p>0·05), which varied in MUFA, PUFA and TUFA content. There was no marked elevation of longer-chain fatty acids (C20–22, cis or trans isomers) into the TRL-TAG fraction following the PHFO meal even though they provided 40% of the total fatty acids in the PHFO meal. The postprandial TRL-TAG response to PHFO was expected to be higher, as it is higher in TUFA, lower in PUFA and similar in saturated fatty acid composition compared with the lard and palm oil test meals. The absence of a higher postprandial response following ingestion of PHFO could be as a result of reduced absorption and increased oxidation of long-chain fatty acids (both cis and trans isomers)

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Professor Michael J. Gibney, fax +353 1 454 2043, email mgibney@tcd.ie
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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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