Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-846f6c7c4f-xq4m6 Total loading time: 0.291 Render date: 2022-07-07T12:20:10.043Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Amino acid composition of hen's egg

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

P. Lunven
Affiliation:
Nutrition Division, FAO, Rome, Italy
C. Le Clement De St Marcq
Affiliation:
Nutrition Division, FAO, Rome, Italy
E. Carnovale
Affiliation:
National Institute of Nutrition, Rome, Italy
A. Fratoni
Affiliation:
National Institute of Nutrition, Rome, Italy
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

1. Pooled samples of eggs from White Leghorn and New Hampshire hens given diets containing 110 and 200 g protein/kg were analysed for their content of essential amino acids.

2. The amino acid composition of the hen's egg protein was not significantly affected by variations in breed and diet.

3. The estimated values for lysine, total sulphur-containing amino acids and tryptophan in egg protein were higher by 8·9, 2·0 and 8%, respectively than those adopted for hen's egg by the FAO/WHO Expert Committee (FAO, 1965).

4. The isoleucine content of egg protein was found to be much lower (338 mg/g nitrogen) than that reported by other workers.

Type
General Nutrition
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1973

References

Association of Official Agricultural Chemists (1965). Official Methods of Analysis. Washington, DC: Association of Official Agricultural Chemists.Google ScholarPubMed
Autret, M., Périssé, J., Sizaret, F. & Cresta, M. (1968). F.A.O. Nutr. Newsl. 6, 1.Google Scholar
Bird, H. R. (1947). Vitams Horm. 5, 163.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Block, R. J. & Mitchell, H. H. (1946-7). Nutr. Abstr. Rec. 16, 249.Google Scholar
Briggs, G. M., Spivey, M. R., Keresztsesy, J. C. & Silverman, M. (1952). Proc. Soc. exp. Biol. Med. 81, 113.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Coppock, J. B. M. & Daniels, M. W. R. (1962). J. Sci. Fd Agric. 13, 459.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cresta, M., Périssé, J., Autret, M. & Lombardo, E. (1971). Annls Nutr. Aliment. 25, 61.Google Scholar
Cunningham, F. E., Cottril, O. J. & Funk, E. M. (1960). Poult. Sci. 39, 300.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Edwards, C. H., Carter, C. P. & Outland, C. E. (1955). J. agric. Fd Chem. 3, 952.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Evans, J. E., Davidson, J. A. & Butts, H. A. (1950). Poult. Sci. 29, 104.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
FAO (1957). F.A.O. Nutr. Stud. no. 16.Google Scholar
FAO (1965). F.A.O. Nutr. Mtg Rep. Ser. no. 37. (Tech. Rep. Ser. Wld HIth Org. no. 301).Google Scholar
FAO (1970). F.A.O. Nutr. Stud. no. 24.Google Scholar
FAO (1973). F.A.O. Nutr. Mtg Rep. Ser. no. 52.Google Scholar
Harper, A. E. (1958). Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. 69, 1025.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ingram, G. R., Cravens, W. W., Elvehjem, C. A. & Halpin, J. G. (1951 a). Poult. Sci. 30, 426.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ingram, G. R., Cravens, W. W., Elvehjem, C. A. & Halpin, J. G. (1951 b). Poult. Sci. 30, 431.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lunven, P. (1963). Qualitas Pl. Mater. veg. 10, 276.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mitchell, H. H. & Block, R. J. (1946). J. biol. Chem. 163, 599.Google Scholar
Moore, S. & Stein, W. H. (1951). J. biol. Chem. 192, 663.Google Scholar
Rutgers University Bureau of Biological Research (1950). Cooperative determination of the nutritive value of six selected protein food sources. New Brunswick: Rutgers Unversity Press.Google Scholar
Schram, E., Moore, s. & Bigwood, E. J. (1954). Biochem. J. 57, 33.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smith, A. H., Wilson, W. O. & Brown, J. G. (1954). Poult. Sci. 33, 898.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
You have Access
41
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Amino acid composition of hen's egg
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Amino acid composition of hen's egg
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Amino acid composition of hen's egg
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *