Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

Associations between added sugars and micronutrient intakes and status: further analysis of data from the National Diet and Nutrition Survey of Young People aged 4 to 18 years

  • Sigrid Gibson (a1) and Alison Boyd (a2)
Abstract

Added sugars are often viewed as ‘empty calories’, negatively impacting micronutrient intakes, yet reviews consider the evidence inconclusive. This study aimed to quantify associations between dietary added sugars (as a percentage of energy) and micronutrient intake and biochemical status in the National Diet and Nutrition Survey. Using data from 1688 British children aged 4–18 years who completed 7 d weighed dietary records in 1997, micronutrient intakes were examined across quintiles of added sugars. After excluding low energy reporters, mean dietary intakes of most nutrients exceeded the reference nutrient intake, except for zinc. Compared with quintile 1 (9 % added sugars), high consumers in quintile 5 (23 % added sugars) had micronutrient intakes ranging from 24 % lower to 6 % higher (mean 14 % lower). Zinc intakes in quintile 1 v. quintile 5 averaged 93 % v. 78 % of reference nutrient intake; magnesium 114 % v. 94 %; iron 115 % v. 100 %; and vitamin A 111 % v. 92 %, respectively. Plasma levels of magnesium, zinc and carotenoids did not vary across quintiles, but weak negative correlations were observed with serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Plasma selenium was inversely correlated with added sugars (r − 0·17; P < 0·0001) but there was no association with glutathione peroxidase. The impact of added sugars on micronutrient intakes appears modest overall but may have relevance for children consuming inadequate amounts of nutrient-rich foods coupled with a diet high in added sugars (approximately 23 %). Further work is needed to explore the impact of different sources of added sugars and to refine assessments of inadequate intakes and status.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Associations between added sugars and micronutrient intakes and status: further analysis of data from the National Diet and Nutrition Survey of Young People aged 4 to 18 years
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Associations between added sugars and micronutrient intakes and status: further analysis of data from the National Diet and Nutrition Survey of Young People aged 4 to 18 years
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Associations between added sugars and micronutrient intakes and status: further analysis of data from the National Diet and Nutrition Survey of Young People aged 4 to 18 years
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Mrs Sigrid Gibson, fax +44 1483 838018, email sigrid@sig-nurture.com
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

3 CH Ruxton , FJ Garceau & RC Cottrell (1999) Guidelines for sugar consumption in Europe: is a quantitative approach justified? Eur J Clin Nutr 53, 503513.

8 S Gibson (1993) Consumption and sources of sugars in the diets of British schoolchildren: are high-sugar diets nutritionally inferior? J Hum Nutr Diet 6, 355371.

9 SA Gibson (1997) Do diets high in sugars compromise micronutrient intakes? Micronutrient intakes in the Dietary and Nutritional Survey of British Adults according to dietary concentration of ‘added’, ‘non-milk extrinsic’ or ‘total’ sugars. J Hum Nutr Diet 10, 125133.

12 S Gibson (2003) Micronutrient intakes, micronutrient status and lipid profiles among young people consuming different amounts of breakfast cereals: further analysis of data from the National Diet and Nutrition Survey of Young People aged 4 to 18 years. Public Health Nutr 6, 815820.

16 TJ Cole , MC Bellizzi , KM Flegal & WH Dietz (2000) Establishing a standard definition for child overweight and obesity worldwide: international survey. Br Med J 320, 12401245.

18 S Gibson & D Neate (2007) Sugar intake, soft drink consumption and body weight among British children: further analysis of National Diet and Nutrition Survey data with adjustment for under-reporting and physical activity. Int J Food Sci Nutr 58, 445460.

20 AE Black (2000) The sensitivity and specificity of the Goldberg cut-off for EI:BMR for identifying diet reports of poor validity. Eur J Clin Nutr 54, 395404.

22 SPB Murphy & I Susan (2005) Challenges in using the dietary reference intakes to plan diets for groups. Nutr Rev 63, 267271.

39 CD Thomson (2004) Assessment of requirements for selenium and adequacy of selenium status: a review. Eur J Clin Nutr 58, 391402.

41 RF Burk & KE Hill (2005) Selenoprotein P: an extracellular protein with unique physical characteristics and a role in selenium homeostasis. Annu Rev Nutr 25, 215235.

42 CD Frary , RK Johnson & MQ Wang (2004) Children and adolescents' choices of foods and beverages high in added sugars are associated with intakes of key nutrients and food groups. J Adolesc Health 34, 5663.

43 SHF Vermunt , WJ Pasman , G Schaafsma & AFM Kardinaal (2007) Effects of sugar intake on body weight: a review. Obes Rev 4, 9199.

44 RM van Dam & JC Seidell (2007) Carbohydrate intake and obesity. Eur J Clin Nutr 61, S75S99.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords:

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 7
Total number of PDF views: 89 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 165 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 23rd August 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.