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Brain creatine depletion in vegetarians? A cross-sectional 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) study

  • Marina Yazigi Solis (a1), Vítor de Salles Painelli (a2), Guilherme Giannini Artioli (a1), Hamilton Roschel (a1) (a2), Maria Concepción Otaduy (a3) and Bruno Gualano (a1) (a2)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114513003802
  • Published online: 29 November 2013
Abstract

The present cross-sectional study aimed to examine the influence of diet on brain creatine (Cr) content by comparing vegetarians with omnivores. Brain Cr content in the posterior cingulate cortex was assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). Dietary Cr intake was assessed by 3 d food recalls. Vegetarians had lower dietary Cr intake than omnivores (0·03 (sd 0·01) v. 1·34 (sd 0·62) g/d, respectively; P= 0·005). However, vegetarians and omnivores had comparable brain total Cr content (5·999 (sd 0·811) v. 5·917 (sd 0·665) IU, respectively; P= 0·77). In conclusion, dietary Cr did not influence brain Cr content in healthy individuals, suggesting that in normal conditions brain is dependent on its own Cr synthesis.

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*Corresponding author: B. Gualano, fax +55 11 3813 5921, email gualano@usp.br
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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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