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    Beck, Jimikaye Chard, Christine A. Hilzendegen, Carolin Hill, James and Stroebele-Benschop, Nanette 2016. In-school versus out-of-school sedentary behavior patterns in U.S. children. BMC Obesity, Vol. 3, Issue. 1,


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    Chaput, J P Schwartz, C Boirie, Y Duclos, M Tremblay, A and Thivel, D 2015. Energy intake adaptations to acute isoenergetic active video games and exercise are similar in obese adolescents. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 69, Issue. 11, p. 1267.


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Children and youth do not compensate for an imposed bout of prolonged sitting by reducing subsequent food intake or increasing physical activity levels: a randomised cross-over study

  • Travis J. Saunders (a1) (a2), Jean-Philippe Chaput (a1) (a2), Gary S. Goldfield (a1) (a2), Rachel C. Colley (a1) (a2), Glen P. Kenny (a2), Eric Doucet (a2) and Mark S. Tremblay (a1) (a2)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S000711451300295X
  • Published online: 04 September 2013
Abstract

The behavioural impact of an imposed bout of prolonged sitting is yet to be investigated in the paediatric population. The objective of the present study was to determine the acute effect of prolonged sitting on ad libitum food intake and spontaneous physical activity (PA) levels in healthy children and youth. A total of twenty healthy youth (twelve males and eight females) aged 10–14 years, with a mean BMI of 18·6 (sd 4·3) kg/m2, were exposed to three experimental conditions in a random order: (1) a day of uninterrupted sitting (Sedentary); (2) a day of sitting interrupted with a 2 min light-intensity walk break every 20 min (Breaks); (3) a day of sitting interrupted with a 2 min light-intensity walk break every 20 min as well as 2 × 20 min of moderate-intensity PA (Breaks+PA). Food intake (ad libitum buffet meal) and PA (accelerometry for 24 h) were assessed following exposure to each experimental condition. Despite significant differences in sedentary behaviour and activity levels during the three in-laboratory sessions (all P< 0·01), we did not observe any differences in ad libitum food intake immediately following exposure to each experimental condition or any changes in the levels of sedentary behaviour or PA in the 24 h following exposure to each experimental condition (all P>0·25). These findings suggest that children and youth may not compensate for an imposed bout of sedentary behaviour by reducing subsequent food intake or increasing PA levels.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: T. J. Saunders, fax +1 613 738 4800, email saunders.travis@gmail.com
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1Sedentary Behaviour Research Network (2012) Letter to the Editor: standardized use of the terms “sedentary” and “sedentary behaviours”. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 37, 540542.

3M Tremblay , A LeBlanc , M Kho , et al. (2011) Systematic review of sedentary behaviour and health indicators in school-aged children and youth. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 8, 98.

4JL Harris , JA Bargh & KD Brownell (2009) Priming effects of television food advertising on eating behaviour. Health Psychol 28, 404413.

6D Thivel , J Aucouturier , E Doucet , et al. (2013) Daily energy balance in children and adolescents. Does energy expenditure predict subsequent energy intake? Appetite 60, 5864.

12D Thivel , L Isacco , C Montaurier , et al. (2012) The 24-h energy intake of obese adolescents is spontaneously reduced after intensive exercise: a randomized controlled trial in calorimetric chambers. PLoS One 7, e29840.

14RR Pate , JA Mitchell , W Byun , et al. (2011) Sedentary behaviour in youth. Br J Sports Med 45, 906913.

17TJ Cole , MC Bellizzi , KM Flegal , et al. (2000) Establishing a standard definition for child overweight and obesity worldwide: international survey. BMJ 320, 12401243.

25PLS Rumbold , A Gibson , S Allsop , et al. (2011) Energy intake and appetite following netball exercise over 5 days in trained 13–15 year old females. Appetite 56, 621628.

27JP Chaput & A Tremblay (2007) Acute effects of knowledge-based work on feeding behaviour and energy intake. Physiol Behav 90, 6672.

31D Thivel , JE Blundell , P Duché , et al. (2012) Acute exercise and subsequent nutritional adaptations: what about obese youths? Sports Med 42, 607613.

33NA King , P Caudwell , M Hopkins , et al. (2007) Metabolic and behavioral compensatory responses to exercise interventions: barriers to weight loss. Obesity 15, 13731383.

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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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