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Correspondence of continuous interstitial glucose measurement against arterialised and capillary glucose following an oral glucose tolerance test in healthy volunteers

  • Louise Dye (a1), Michael Mansfield (a2), Nicola Lasikiewicz (a1), Lena Mahawish (a2), Rainer Schnell (a3), Duncan Talbot (a4), Hitesh Chauhan (a4), Fiona Croden (a1) and Clare Lawton (a1)...

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to validate the Glucoday® continuous interstitial ambulatory glucose-monitoring device (AGD) against plasma glucose measured from arterialised venous (AV) and glucose from capillary whole blood (finger prick, FP) in non-diabetic subjects in response to an oral glucose tolerance test. Fifteen healthy overweight men (age 30–49 years, BMI 26–31 kg/m2) participated. Glucose levels were measured before, during and after consumption of an oral 75 g glucose load using twelve FP samples and forty-four 1 ml AV blood samples during 180 min. Interstitial glucose was measured via the AGD. Three venous samples for fasting insulin were taken to estimate insulin resistance. Profiles of AGD, AV and FP glucose were generated for each participant. Glucose values for each minute of the measurement period were interpolated using a locally weighted scatterplot smoother. Data were compared using Bland–Altman plots that showed good correspondence between all pairs of measurements. Concordance between the three methods was 0·8771 (Kendall's W, n 15, P < 0·001). Concordance was greater between AV and FP (W = 0·9696) than AGD and AV (W = 0·8770) or AGD and FP (W = 0·8764). Analysis of time to peak glucose indicated that AGD measures lagged approximately 15 min behind FP and AV measures. Percent body fat was significantly correlated with time to peak glucose levels for each measure, while BMI and estimated insulin resistance (homeostatic model assessment, HOMA) were not. In conclusion, AGD shows good correspondence with FP and AV glucose measures in response to a glucose load with a 15 min time lag. Taking this into account, AGD has potential application in nutrition and behaviour studies.

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Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Louise Dye, fax +44 113 3435749, email l.dye@leeds.ac.uk

References

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