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Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids enhance metastatic dissemination of murine T lymphoma cells

  • Antonella Mannini (a1), Nadja Kerstin (a1), Lido Calorini (a1), Gabriele Mugnai (a1) and Salvatore Ruggieri (a1)...
Abstract

Epidemiological investigation and animal studies have shown that dietary n-3 PUFA prevent the development and progression of certain types of cancer. However, conflicting results have been reported by the few studies that focused on the effect of dietary n-3 PUFA on the development of metastases. In the present study, we investigated the metastatic dissemination of murine T lymphoma lines with different metastatic potential transplanted into mice fed a fish oil diet, compared with mice fed a maize oil diet. Transplantation of highly metastatic S11 cells into animals fed a fish oil diet induced a large lymphomatoid infiltration in the spleen, associated with an eight-fold increase in spleen weight, compared with normal animals on the same diet. In contrast, only a limited increase in spleen weight was found in animals transplanted with S11 cells while fed a maize oil diet. No significant increase in spleen weight was found in animals transplanted with low-metastatic 164T2 cells regardless of whether they were fed a fish oil or a maize oil diet. At the end of experiment, an overt cachexia was shown by animals fed a fish oil diet transplanted with S11 cells, but not by those transplanted with 164T2 cells. The particularly high pro-metastatic effect of dietary n-3 PUFA on S11 cells rules out the generalisation that dietary n-3 PUFA inhibit tumour growth and progression.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Dr Salvatore Ruggieri, fax +39 55 4598900, email salvatore.ruggieri@unifi.it
References
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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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