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Diet-induced antisecretory factor prevents intracranial hypertension in a dosage-dependent manner

  • Ewa Johansson (a1), Mohamed Al-Olama (a1) (a2), Hans-Arne Hansson (a1), Stefan Lange (a1) and Eva Jennische (a1)...

Abstract

Intake of specially processed cereal (SPC) stimulates endogenous antisecretory factor (AF) activity, and SPC intake has proven to be beneficial for a number of clinical conditions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the dosage relationship between SPC intake and plasma AF activity and to further correlate achieved AF levels to a biological effect. SPC was fed to rats in concentrations of 5, 10 or 15 % for 2 weeks. A further group was fed 5 % SPC for 4 weeks. AF activity and the complement factors C3c and factor H were analysed in plasma after the feeding period. Groups of rats fed the various SPC concentrations were subjected to a standardised freezing brain injury, known to induce increases in intracranial pressure (ICP). The AF activity in plasma increased after intake of SPC, in a dosage- and time-dependent manner. The complement factors C3c and factor H increased in a time-dependent manner. Measurements of ICP in animals fed with SPC prior to the brain injury showed that the ICP was significantly lower, compared with that of injured rats fed with a standard feed, and that the change was dose and time dependent. AF activity increases, in a dosage- and time-dependent manner, after intake of SPC. The inverse relationship between ICP after a head injury and the percentage of SPC in the feed indicate that the protective effect is, to a large extent, due to AF.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Dr E. Jennische, fax +46 31 41 61 08, email eva.jennische@anatcell.gu.se

References

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