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The effect of amino-acid-supplemented wheat gluten on cholesterol metabolism in the rat*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 March 2008

M. Bassat
Affiliation:
Department of Food Engineering and Biotechnology Technion, Haifa, 32000, Israel
S. Mokady
Affiliation:
Department of Food Engineering and Biotechnology Technion, Haifa, 32000, Israel
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Abstract

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1. The effect of lysine- and threonine-supplemented wheat gluten on cholesterol metabolism was studied using male weanling rats. Animals were fed on cholesterol-free diets containing 100 or 200 g gluten/kg with or without amino acid supplementation, and compared with animals given 50, 100 and 200 g casein/kg diets, for 3 weeks.

2. A hypocholesterolaemic effect observed with the wheat gluten-fed rats, compared with the animals given 100 and 200 g casein/kg diets, was accompanied by increased turnover of cholesterol as expressed by enhanced cholesterol biosynthesis and increased faecal excretion of cholesterol and bile acids. This effect was not abolished by lysine and threonine supplementation.

3. Low levels of blood cholesterol were also observed in the rats fed on the 50 g casein/kg diet. However, a different mechanism, related to impairment of cholesterol transport from the liver, was most likely responsible for the hypocholesterolaemia found in these protein-malnourished animals.

4. The effect on cholesterol metabolism produced by dietary wheat gluten was independent of the low quality of the protein and of its specific deficiency in lysine and threonine.

Type
Papers of direct relevance to Clinical and Human Nutrition
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1985

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