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Effect of environmental temperature on muscle protein turnover and heat production in tube-fed broiler chickens

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

Vitus D. Yunianto
Affiliation:
Department of Biochemical Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890, Japan
K. Hayashit
Affiliation:
Department of Biochemical Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890, Japan
S. Kaiwda
Affiliation:
Department of Biochemical Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890, Japan
A. Ohtsuka
Affiliation:
Department of Biochemical Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890, Japan
Y. Tomita
Affiliation:
Department of Biochemical Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890, Japan
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Abstract

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The present experiments4 were undertaken to investigate the effects of environmental temperatures on growth, abdominal fat content, rate of muscle protein turnover, and heat production in tube-fed intact male broiler chickens. Plasma concentrations of thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), and corticosterone (CTC) were also examined. Chicks (15d old) were kept at different environmental temperatures (16,19,22,25,28,31, and 34°) and given the experimental diet (200g crude protein/kg, 13·;57M/kg metabolizable energy) by tube three times daily throughout the 12d experimental period. In the hot conditions, except for 34°, body-weight gain was significantly higher than in the cold conditions. Thus, food conversion ratios (food: gain ratios) were lower when the birds were exposed to the hot conditions other than 34°. Likewise, abdominal fat content was significantly increased, and heat production was lower in the groups kept under the hot conditions other than 34°. The rate of skeletal muscle protein turnover and plasma concentration of CTC were decreased when the birds were exposed to hot conditions other than 34°. suggesting a role of CTC in the regulation of muscle protein turnover. Plasma concentrations of T4 and T3 were significantly decreased as environmental temperature increased. These results clearly show that plasma concentrations of thyroid hormones and CTC are associated with accelerated muscle protein turnover and heat production.

Type
Animal Nutrition
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1997

References

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