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Effects of condensed tannins prepared from leaves of fodder plants on digestive enzymes in vitro and in the intestine of rats

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

T. Horigome
Affiliation:
College of Agriculture, Okayama University, Tsushima, Okayama 700, Japan
R. Kumar
Affiliation:
College of Agriculture, Okayama University, Tsushima, Okayama 700, Japan
K. Okamoto
Affiliation:
College of Agriculture, Okayama University, Tsushima, Okayama 700, Japan
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Abstract

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1. Of the nineteen plants screened, six were found to contain large quantities of condensed tannins. Black locust (Robinia pseudo-Acacia), bush clover (Lespedeza bicolor), wistaria (Wistaria floribunda) and Japanese knotgrass (Reynoutria japonica) were used for the present experiment. Tannins of the investigated plants were fractionated into three or four molecular forms, according to the degree of polymerization, by chromatography on a column of Sephadex LH-20.

2. The protein-precipitating capacity of the fractionated tannins increased with the increase in degree of polymerization. The inhibitory effect of tannins on trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4), a-amylase (EC 3.2.1.1) and lipase (EC 3.1.1.3) activities in vitro also increased with the increase in degree of polymerization. The digestion of tannin-bovine serum albumin complex by trypsin was related to the degree of polymerization of tannins complexed.

3. Inclusion of black locust tannins in the diet (10 g/kg) depressed the activities of trypsin and α-amylase in the upper, middle and lower parts of the intestine of the rats, but the lipase activity was increased in the middle part and remained unaffected in the upper and lower parts. It is presumed that the tannins have little affinity for lipase.

4. Digestion trials, when the microflora level of the alimentary canal of rats was reduced by dietary antibiotic treatment, revealed that the inclusion of tannins in the diet (20 g/kg) depressed the digestibilities of proximate constituents, except crude fat, and increased faecal bile acid excretion.

Type
General Nutrition papers
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1988

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