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Effects of dietary fat modification on oxidative stress and inflammatory markers in the LIPGENE study

  • Helena Petersson (a1), Ulf Risérus (a1), Jolene McMonagle (a2), Hanne L. Gulseth (a3) (a4), Audrey C. Tierney (a2), Sophie Morange (a5), Olfa Helal (a6) (a7) (a8), Danielle I. Shaw (a9), Juan A. Ruano (a10), José López-Miranda (a10), Beata Kieć-Wilk (a11), Iwona Gołąbek (a11), Ellen E. Blaak (a12), Wim H. M. Saris (a12), Christian A. Drevon (a4), Julie A. Lovegrove (a9) (a13), Helen M. Roche (a2) and Samar Basu (a1)...
Abstract

Subjects with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) have enhanced oxidative stress and inflammation. Dietary fat quality has been proposed to be implicated in these conditions. We investigated the impact of four diets distinct in fat quantity and quality on 8-iso-PGF (a major F2-isoprostane and oxidative stress indicator), 15-keto-13,14-dihydro-PGF (15-keto-dihydro-PGF, a major PGF metabolite and marker of cyclooxygenase-mediated inflammation) and C-reactive protein (CRP). In a 12-week parallel multicentre dietary intervention study (LIPGENE), 417 volunteers with the MetS were randomly assigned to one of the four diets: two high-fat diets (38 % energy (%E)) rich in SFA or MUFA and two low-fat high-complex carbohydrate diets (28 %E) with (LFHCC n-3) or without (LFHCC) 1·24 g/d of very long chain n-3 fatty acid supplementation. Urinary levels of 8-iso-PGF and 15-keto-dihydro-PGF were determined by RIA and adjusted for urinary creatinine levels. Serum concentration of CRP was measured by ELISA. Neither concentrations of 8-iso-PGF and 15-keto-dihydro-PGF nor those of CRP differed between diet groups at baseline (P>0·07) or at the end of the study (P>0·44). Also, no differences in changes of the markers were observed between the diet groups (8-iso-PGF, P = 0·83; 15-keto-dihydro-PGF, P = 0·45; and CRP, P = 0·97). In conclusion, a 12-week dietary fat modification did not affect the investigated markers of oxidative stress and inflammation among subjects with the MetS in the LIPGENE study.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Dr U. Risérus, fax +46 18 611 79 76, email ulf.riserus@pubcare.uu.se
References
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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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