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Effects of dietary trans-fatty acids on reproductive performance of Wistar rats

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

T. Hanis
Affiliation:
Institute of Physiology, Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czechoslovakia
V. Zidek
Affiliation:
Institute of Physiology, Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czechoslovakia
J. Sachova
Affiliation:
Research Institute of Animal Production, Prague, Czechoslovakia
P. Klir
Affiliation:
Institute of Physiology, Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czechoslovakia
Z. Deyl
Affiliation:
Institute of Physiology, Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czechoslovakia
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Abstract

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1. Wistar rats were fed for three successive generations on a semi-purified diet, in which the fat was provided by butter, sunflower oil, rapeseed oil or hydrogenated vegetable fat, differing in the content of cis, cis-18:2 and trans-18:1 fatty acids. Effects of these fats on the composition of adipose tissue and reproductive performance were studied. Fatty acids were analysed using high-performance liquid chromatography.

2. The fatty acid pattern of adipose tissue was closely related to dietary fat composition and, established in the first generation, did not change significantly in successive generations of rats.

3. Hydrogenated fat adversely affected litter size, sperm morphology and regularity of oestrous cycle, and prolonged the period of gestation in experimental animals. Differences observed between the generations were not significant.

4. Hydrogenated fat decreased the level of serum testosterone in males, but the differences observed in levels of serum progesterone in females were not apparently related to the dietary trans-fatty acids.

Type
Lipid Metabolism
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1989

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