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Egg consumption and risk of incident type 2 diabetes: a dose–response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

  • Martha Tamez (a1), Jyrki K. Virtanen (a2) and Martin Lajous (a3) (a4)
Abstract

Experimental data suggest that egg intake could have a beneficial impact on several risk factors for type 2 diabetes. In contrast, some recent epidemiological studies have concluded that egg consumption may increase diabetes risk. We performed a dose–response meta-analysis of prospective cohorts on the relation of egg consumption with incident type 2 diabetes. We searched for cohort studies that assessed egg consumption and diabetes risk up to June 2015. We identified 416 articles and extracted data independently and in duplicate from ten eligible studies. We used random-effects generalised least squares models for pooled dose–response estimation based on thirteen estimates. Our study included 251 213 individuals and 12 156 incident type 2 diabetes cases. Egg intake was associated with incident type 2 diabetes (risk ratio (RR)/egg per d 1·13; 95 % CI 1·04, 1·22). We identified study location as a major source of heterogeneity. For studies conducted in the USA, we observed a stronger association (RR 1·47; 95 % CI 1·32, 1·64), whereas results were null for studies conducted elsewhere. Studies considered to be of high quality yielded null findings (RR 0·94; 95 % CI 0·74, 1·19). The association of egg intake with increased risk of incident type 2 diabetes may be restricted to US cohort studies. There are limited data to support a biological mechanism that could underlie this association; thus, the possibility that these results may be due to residual confounding by dietary behaviours restricted to certain populations cannot be excluded.

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Corresponding author
* Corresponding author: M. Lajous, email mlajous@insp.mx
References
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