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Emerging diet-related surrogate end points for colorectal cancer: UK Food Standards Agency diet and colonic health workshop report

  • Peter Sanderson (a1), Ian T. Johnson (a2), John C. Mathers (a3), Hilary J. Powers (a4), C. Stephen Downes (a5), Angela P. McGlynn (a5), Rae Dare (a5), Ellen Kampman (a6), Beatrice L. Pool-Zobel (a7), Sheila A. Bingham (a8) and Joseph J. Rafter (a9)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1079/BJN20031035
  • Published online: 01 March 2007
Abstract

The UK Food Standards Agency convened a group of expert scientists to review current research investigating emerging diet-related surrogate end points for colorectal cancer (CRC). The workshop aimed to overview current research and establish priorities for future research. The workshop considered that the validation of current putative diet-related surrogate end points for CRC and the development of novel ones, particularly in the emerging fields of proteomics, genomics and epigenomics, should be a high priority for future research.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Dr Peter Sanderson, fax +44 20 7276 8906, email peter.sanderson@foodstandards.gsi.gov.uk
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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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