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A high-protein, moderate-energy, regular cheesy snack is energetically compensated in human subjects

  • Mylène Potier (a1) (a2), Gilles Fromentin (a1) (a3), Juliane Calvez (a1) (a3), Robert Benamouzig (a4), Christine Martin-Rouas (a5), Lisa Pichon (a2), Daniel Tomé (a1) (a3) and Agnès Marsset-Baglieri (a1) (a3)...
Abstract

Snacking is often regarded as a cause of overweight. However, the main issue is to determine whether the consumption of snacks leads to an increase in energy intake or whether a compensation phenomenon exists and maintains daily energy intake at a constant level. The objective of the present study was to determine whether the repeated consumption of a high-protein, moderate-energy, cheesy snack given as a preload 1 h before a meal altered energy intake at the next meal and then throughout the day, and if this kind of snack was energetically compensated. Normal-weight women (n 27) were recruited for the study. All subjects were healthy non-smokers, aged 18–60 years. The snacks consisted of portions of cheese containing 22 g protein, with an energy value of 836 kJ. Two types of snack were compared, differing in terms of the type of milk proteins they contained: the first contained casein only (CAS), while the second contained a mixture of casein and whey proteins (WHEY+CAS; 2:1). The principal finding of the present study was that the ingestion of the two snacks 1 h before lunch led to energy compensation of 83·1 (sem 9·4) and 67·0 (sem 16·4) % for WHEY+CAS and CAS respectively, at lunch, and 121·6 (sem 36·5) and 142·1 (sem 29·7) % for WHEY+CAS and CAS respectively, regarding the whole-day energy intake. In conclusion, the repeated consumption of a high-protein, moderate-energy, regular cheesy snack should not promote overweight because energy intake appears to be regulated during subsequent meals on the same day.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Dr Agnès Marsset-Baglieri, fax +33 1 44 08 18 58, email agnes.marsset-baglieri@agroparistech.fr
References
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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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