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    Schwager, Joseph Bompard, Albine Weber, Peter and Raederstorff, Daniel 2015. Ascorbic acid modulates cell migration in differentiated HL-60 cells and peripheral blood leukocytes. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, Vol. 59, Issue. 8, p. 1513.


    Torrão, Rita C. Bennett, Stuart J. Brown, James E. and Griffiths, Helen R. 2014. Does metabolic reprogramming underpin age-associated changes in T cell phenotype and function?. Free Radical Biology and Medicine, Vol. 71, p. 26.


    Gao, Dan Pararasa, Chathyan Dunston, Christopher R. Bailey, Clifford J. and Griffiths, Helen R. 2012. Palmitate promotes monocyte atherogenicity via de novo ceramide synthesis. Free Radical Biology and Medicine, Vol. 53, Issue. 4, p. 796.


    Torr, E E Gardner, D H Thomas, L Goodall, D M Bielemeier, A Willetts, R Griffiths, H R Marshall, L J and Devitt, A 2012. Apoptotic cell-derived ICAM-3 promotes both macrophage chemoattraction to and tethering of apoptotic cells. Cell Death and Differentiation, Vol. 19, Issue. 4, p. 671.


    Cockcroft, Shamshad and Garner, Kathryn 2011. Function of the phosphatidylinositol transfer protein gene family: is phosphatidylinositol transfer the mechanism of action?. Critical Reviews in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Vol. 46, Issue. 2, p. 89.


    Griffiths, Helen R. Dunston, Christopher R. Bennett, Stuart J. Grant, Melissa M. Phillips, Darren C. and Kitas, George D. 2011. Free radicals and redox signalling in T-cells during chronic inflammation and ageing: Figure 1. Biochemical Society Transactions, Vol. 39, Issue. 5, p. 1273.


    Wittwer, Jonas Rubio-Aliaga, Isabel Hoeft, Birgit Bendik, Igor Weber, Peter and Daniel, Hannelore 2011. Nutrigenomics in human intervention studies: Current status, lessons learned and future perspectives. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, Vol. 55, Issue. 3, p. 341.


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In vivo vitamin C supplementation increases phosphoinositol transfer protein expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals

  • Helen R. Griffiths (a1), Rachel S. Willetts (a1), Melissa M. Grant (a1), Nalini Mistry (a2), Joe Lunec (a2) and Ruth J. Bevan (a2)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114508079646
  • Published online: 24 October 2008
Abstract

Ascorbate can act as both a reducing and oxidising agent in vitro depending on its environment. It can modulate the intracellular redox environment of cells and therefore is predicted to modulate thiol-dependent cell signalling and gene expression pathways. Using proteomic analysis of vitamin C-treated T cells in vitro, we have previously reported changes in expression of five functional protein groups associated with signalling, carbohydrate metabolism, apoptosis, transcription and immune function. The increased expression of the signalling molecule phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PITP) was also confirmed using Western blotting. Herein, we have compared protein changes elicited by ascorbate in vitro, with the effect of ascorbate on plasma potassium levels, on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) apoptosis and PITP expression, in patients supplemented with vitamin C (0–2 g/d) for up to 10 weeks to investigate whether in vitro model systems are predictive of in vivo effects. PITP varied in expression widely between subjects at all time-points analysed but was increased by supplementation with 2 g ascorbate/d after 5 and 10 weeks. No effects on plasma potassium levels were observed in supplemented subjects despite a reduction of K+ channel proteins in ascorbate-treated T cells in vitro. Similarly, no effect of vitamin C supplementation on PBMC apoptosis was observed, whilst ascorbate decreased expression of caspase 3 recruitment domain protein in vitro. These data provide one of the first demonstrations that proteomics may be valuable in developing predictive markers of nutrient effects in vivo and may identify novel pathways for studying mechanisms of action in vivo.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Professor Helen R. Griffiths, fax +44 121 359 5142, email h.r.griffiths@aston.ac.uk
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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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