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Lipid atherogenic risk markers can be more favourably influenced by the cis-9,trans-11-octadecadienoate isomer than a conjugated linoleic acid mixture or fish oil in hamsters

  • Karine Valeille (a1), Daniel Gripois (a2), Marie-France Blouquit (a2), Maamar Souidi (a3), Michel Riottot (a2), Jean-Christophe Bouthegourd (a4), Colette Sérougne (a2) and Jean-Charles Martin (a2)...

Abstract

The aim of our present study was to compare the efficiency of conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) and fish oil in modulating atherogenic risk markers. Adult male hamsters were given a cholesterol-rich diet (0·6 g/kg) for 8 weeks; the diet was supplemented with 5 g cis-9,trans-11-CLA isomer/kg, 12 g CLA mixture (CLA-mix)/kg, 12 g fish oil/kg or 12 g fish oil + 12 g CLA-mix/kg. The plasma cholesterol status was improved only with the cis-9,trans-11-CLA (HDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol:LDL-cholesterol ratio, P<0·05), but was of borderline significance for CLA-mix (HDL-cholesterol:LDL-cholesterol ratio, P=0·06), with an increase (33–40 %) in the liver lipoprotein receptors (scavenger receptor-type I and LDL ApoB/E receptor) and HDL-binding protein 2 (P<0·05). A 100 % pigment gallstones incidence and a slight insulin resistance (homeostatic model assessment index) were observed in the CLA-mix-fed hamsters (P=−0·031). In comparison, fish-oil feeding alone improved merely the scavenger receptor-type I and HDL-binding protein 2 liver status and faeces sterol output. For most of our present observations, the concomitant intake of fish oil and CLA-mix gave dominant effects that were exclusive and specific to one or the other oil. In conclusion, part of the beneficial effects of CLA in the present study can be ascribed to the cis-9,trans-11-isomer, and these did not generally overlap with those of fish oil. In addition, the CLA-mix effects are clearly affected by the marine (n-3) fatty acids.

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      Lipid atherogenic risk markers can be more favourably influenced by the cis-9,trans-11-octadecadienoate isomer than a conjugated linoleic acid mixture or fish oil in hamsters
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      Lipid atherogenic risk markers can be more favourably influenced by the cis-9,trans-11-octadecadienoate isomer than a conjugated linoleic acid mixture or fish oil in hamsters
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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Dr Jean-Charles Martin, fax +33 1 69 15 70 74, email jean-charles.martin@ibaic.u-psud.fr

References

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Lipid atherogenic risk markers can be more favourably influenced by the cis-9,trans-11-octadecadienoate isomer than a conjugated linoleic acid mixture or fish oil in hamsters

  • Karine Valeille (a1), Daniel Gripois (a2), Marie-France Blouquit (a2), Maamar Souidi (a3), Michel Riottot (a2), Jean-Christophe Bouthegourd (a4), Colette Sérougne (a2) and Jean-Charles Martin (a2)...

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