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Modulatory effect of α-linolenic acid-rich garden cress (Lepidium sativum L.) seed oil on inflammatory mediators in adult albino rats

  • Bastihalli Tukaramrao Diwakar (a1), Belur Ramaswamy Lokesh (a2) and Kamatham Akhilender Naidu (a1)
Abstract

Vegetable oils containing α-linolenic acid (ALA; 18 : 3n-3) have been shown to modulate the functions of immunocompetent cells. The aim of the present study was to understand the modulatory effect of ALA-rich garden cress (Lepidium sativum L.) seed oil (GCO) on lipid composition, spleen lymphocyte (SL) proliferation and inflammatory mediator production by peritoneal macrophages (PMΦ) in rats. Female Wistar rats were fed diets containing either GCO (2·5, 5·0 and 10 %, w/w) or sunflower oil (SFO, 10 % w/w) for 8 weeks. Ex vivo proliferation of SL was measured by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. IL-2 and TNF-α in SL and PMΦ were analysed by ELISA. Inflammatory mediators such as NO, leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and H2O2 were measured in mitogen-activated PMΦ. GCO significantly increased the levels of ALA, EPA and DHA, but reduced linoleic acid and arachidonic acid in SL and PMΦ lipids. GCO (10 %) significantly decreased the concanavalin A (Con-A)- and phytohaemagglutinin-mediated proliferation of SL by 54 and 38 %, respectively, in comparison with SFO. A marginal decrease in IL-2 and TNF-α was observed in Con-A-stimulated SL and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated PMΦ. LTB4 levels in Ca ionophore-stimulated PMΦ were reduced by 40 % in GCO-fed rats. NO release in response to various stimuli was significantly decreased in PMΦ of GCO-fed rats. The present study is the first report on the modulatory efficacy of GCO on immunomediators in rats. GCO modulated inflammatory mediators such as NO and LTB4, and thus may play a role in alleviating inflammatory conditions favourably.

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      Modulatory effect of α-linolenic acid-rich garden cress (Lepidium sativum L.) seed oil on inflammatory mediators in adult albino rats
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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Dr K. A. Naidu, fax +91 821 2517233, email akhilnaidu@gmail.com
References
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