Skip to main content
×
Home

Oral hydroxycitrate supplementation enhances glycogen synthesis in exercised human skeletal muscle

  • I-Shiung Cheng (a1), Shih-Wei Huang (a2), Hsang-Chu Lu (a1), Ching-Lin Wu (a3), Ying-Chieh Chu (a1), Shin-Da Lee (a4) (a5), Chih-Yang Huang (a6) (a7) and Chia-Hua Kuo (a4) (a8)...
Abstract

Glycogen stored in skeletal muscle is the main fuel for endurance exercise. The present study examined the effects of oral hydroxycitrate (HCA) supplementation on post-meal glycogen synthesis in exercised human skeletal muscle. Eight healthy male volunteers (aged 22·0 (se 0·3) years) completed a 60-min cycling exercise at 70–75 % and received HCA or placebo in a crossover design repeated after a 7 d washout period. They consumed 500 mg HCA or placebo with a high-carbohydrate meal (2 g carbohydrate/kg body weight, 80 % carbohydrate, 8 % fat, 12 % protein) for a 3-h post-exercise recovery. Muscle biopsy samples were obtained from vastus lateralis immediately and 3 h after the exercise. We found that HCA supplementation significantly lowered post-meal insulin response with similar glucose level compared to placebo. The rate of glycogen synthesis with the HCA meal was approximately onefold higher than that with the placebo meal. In contrast, GLUT4 protein level after HCA supplementation was significantly decreased below the placebo level, whereas expression of fatty acid translocase (FAT)/CD36 mRNA was significantly increased above the placebo level. Furthermore, HCA supplementation significantly increased energy reliance on fat oxidation, estimated by the gaseous exchange method. However, no differences were found in circulating NEFA and glycerol levels with the HCA meal compared with the placebo meal. The present study reports the first evidence that HCA supplementation enhanced glycogen synthesis rate in exercised human skeletal muscle and improved post-meal insulin sensitivity.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Oral hydroxycitrate supplementation enhances glycogen synthesis in exercised human skeletal muscle
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Oral hydroxycitrate supplementation enhances glycogen synthesis in exercised human skeletal muscle
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Oral hydroxycitrate supplementation enhances glycogen synthesis in exercised human skeletal muscle
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: C.-H. Kuo, fax +886 2 28753383, email kuochiahua@gmail.com
References
Hide All
1 Lewis YS & Neelakantan S (1965) Hydroxycitric acid – the principal acid in the fruit of G. cambogia. Phytochemistry 4, 619625.
2 Tomita K, Okuhara Y, Shigematsu N, et al. (2003) ( − )-Hydroxycitrate ingestion increases fat oxidation during moderate intensity exercise in untrained men. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 67, 19992001.
3 Garland PB, Randle PJ & Newsholme EA (1963) Citrate as an intermediary in the inhibition of phosphofructokinase in rat heart muscle by fatty acids, ketone bodies, pyruvate, diabetes, and starvation. Nature 200, 169170.
4 Munday MR (2002) Regulation of mammalian acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Biochem Soc Trans 30, Pt 6, 10591064.
5 Watson JA, Fang M & Lowenstein JM (1969) Tricarballylate and hydroxycitrate: substrate and inhibitor of ATP: citrate oxaloacetate lyase. Arch Biochem Biophys 135, 209217.
6 Hayamizu K, Hirakawa H, Oikawa D, et al. (2003) Effect of Garcinia cambogia extract on serum leptin and insulin in mice. Fitoterapia 74, 267273.
7 Ishihara K, Oyaizu S, Onuki K, et al. (2000) Chronic ( − )-hydroxycitrate administration spares carbohydrate utilization and promotes lipid oxidation during exercise in mice. J Nutr 130, 29902995.
8 Lim K, Ryu S, Nho HS, et al. (2003) ( − )-Hydroxycitric acid ingestion increases fat utilization during exercise in untrained women. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol 49, 163167.
9 Leonhardt M, Balkan B & Langhans W (2004) Effect of hydroxycitrate on respiratory quotient, energy expenditure, and glucose tolerance in male rats after a period of restrictive feeding. Nutrition 20, 911915.
10 Luiken JJ, Dyck DJ, Han XX, et al. (2002) Insulin induces the translocation of the fatty acid transporter FAT/CD36 to the plasma membrane. Am J Physiol 282, E491E495.
11 Ivy J & Kuo C (1998) Regulation of GLUT4 protein and glycogen synthase during muscle glycogen synthesis after exercise. Acta Physiol Scand 162, 295304.
12 Bonen A, Tandon NN, Glatz JF, et al. (2006) The fatty acid transporter FAT/CD36 is upregulated in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues in human obesity and type 2 diabetes. Int J Obes 30, 877883.
13 Kahn BB, Rosen AS, Bak JF, et al. (1992) Expression of GLUT1 and GLUT4 glucose transporters in skeletal muscle of humans with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: regulatory effects of metabolic factors. J Clin Endocrin Metab 74, 11011109.
14 Cheng IS, Liao SF, Liu KL, et al. (2009) Effect of dietary glycemic index on substrate transporter gene expression in human skeletal muscle after exercise. Eur J Clin Nutr 63, 14041410.
15 Bergstrom J (1962) Muscle electrolytes in man. Determined by neutron activation analysis on needle biopsy specimens. Scand J Clin Lab Invest 68, 1113.
16 Laurell S & Tibbling G (1966) An enzymatic fluorometric micro-method for the determination of glycerol. Clin Chim Acta 13, 317322.
17 Soni MG, Burdock GA, Preuss HG, et al. (2004) Safety assessment of ( − )-hydroxycitric acid and Super CitriMaxR, a novel calcium/potassium salt. Food Chem Toxicol 42, 15131529.
18 Richter E, Derave W & Wojtaszewski J (2001) Glucose, exercise and insulin: emerging concepts. J Physiol 535, 313322.
19 Kriketos AD, Thompson HR, Greene H, et al. (1999) ( − )-Hydroxycitric acid does not affect energy expenditure and substrate oxidation in adult males in a post-absorptive state. Int J Obes 23, 867873.
20 van Loon LJ, van Rooijen JJ, Niesen B, et al. (2000) Effects of acute ( − )-hydroxycitrate supplementation on substrate metabolism at rest and during exercise in humans. Am J Clin Nutr 72, 14451450.
21 Wielinga PY, Wachters-Hagedoorn RE, Bouter B, et al. (2005) Hydroxycitric acid delays intestinal glucose absorption in rats. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 288, G1144G1149.
22 McCune SA, Foe LG, Kemp RG, et al. (1989) Aurintricarboxylic acid is a potent inhibitor of phosphofructokinase. Biochem J 259, 925927.
23 Luiken JJ, Arumugam Y, Bell RC, et al. (2002) Changes in fatty acid transport and transporters are related to the severity of insulin deficiency. Am J Physiol 283, E612E621.
24 Bonen A, Parolin ML, Steinberg GR, et al. (2004) Triacylglycerol accumulation in human obesity and type 2 diabetes is associated with increased rates of skeletal muscle fatty acid transport and increased sarcolemmal FAT/CD36. FASEB J 18, 11441146.
25 Cameron-Smith D, Burke LM, Angus DJ, et al. (2003) A short-term, high-fat diet up-regulates lipid metabolism and gene expression in human skeletal muscle. Am J Clin Nutr 77, 313318.
26 Civitarese AE, Hesselink MK, Russell AP, et al. (2005) Glucose ingestion during exercise blunts exercise-induced gene expression of skeletal muscle fat oxidative genes. Am J Physiol 289, E1023E1029.
27 Kuo CH, Browning KS & Ivy JL (1999) Regulation of GLUT4 protein expression and glycogen storage after prolonged exercise. Acta Physiol Scand 165, 193201.
28 Kuo CH, Hunt DG, Ding Z, et al. (1999) Effect of carbohydrate supplementation on postexercise GLUT-4 protein expression in skeletal muscle. J Appl Physiol 87, 22902295.
29 Ivy JL (1991) Muscle glycogen synthesis before and after exercise. Sports Med 11, 619.
30 Foster DW & McGarry JD (1982) The regulation of ketogenesis. Ciba Found Symp 87, 120131.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords:

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 27
Total number of PDF views: 210 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 351 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 25th November 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.