Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Prevalence and characteristics of misreporting of energy intake in US children and adolescents: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003–2012

  • Kentaro Murakami (a1) and M. Barbara E. Livingstone (a2)

Abstract

Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003–2012, we investigated the prevalence and characteristics of under- and over-reporting of energy intake (EI) among 14 044 US children and adolescents aged 2–19 years. For the assessment of EI, two 24-h dietary recalls were conducted with the use of the US Department of Agriculture Automated Multiple-Pass Method. Under-, plausible and over-reporters of EI were identified using two methods: based on the 95 % confidence limits (1) for agreement between the ratio of EI:BMR and a physical activity level for sedentary lifestyle (1·55) and (2) of the expected ratio of EI:estimated energy requirement (EER) of 1·0. BMR was calculated using Schofield’s equations. EER was calculated using equations from the US Dietary Reference Intakes, assuming ‘low active’ level of physical activity. The risk of being an under- or over-reporter compared with a plausible reporter was analysed using multiple logistic regression. Percentages of under-, plausible and over-reporters were 13·1, 81·5 and 5·4 %, respectively, based on EI:BMR and 18·8, 72·3 and 8·8 %, respectively, based on EI:EER. Under-reporting was associated with older age, non-Hispanic blacks (compared with non-Hispanic whites) and overweight and obesity (compared with normal weight). Over-reporting was associated with younger age, lower family poverty income ratio, normal weight and the first survey cycle. Similar findings were obtained when analysing only the first 24-h recall data from NHANES 1999–2012 (n 22 949). In conclusion, we found that EI misreporting remains prevalent and differential in US children and adolescents.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Prevalence and characteristics of misreporting of energy intake in US children and adolescents: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003–2012
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Prevalence and characteristics of misreporting of energy intake in US children and adolescents: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003–2012
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Prevalence and characteristics of misreporting of energy intake in US children and adolescents: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003–2012
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Dr K. Murakami, fax +81 749 49 8499, email kenmrkm@m.u-tokyo.ac.jp

References

Hide All
1. Livingstone, MBE & Black, AE (2003) Markers of the validity of reported energy intake. J Nutr 133, Suppl. 3, 895S920S.
2. Tooze, JA, Subar, AF, Thompson, FE, et al. (2004) Psychosocial predictors of energy underreporting in a large doubly labeled water study. Am J Clin Nutr 79, 795804.
3. Mattisson, I, Wirfalt, E, Aronsson, CA, et al. (2005) Misreporting of energy: prevalence, characteristics of misreporters and influence on observed risk estimates in the Malmo Diet and Cancer cohort. Br J Nutr 94, 832842.
4. Poppitt, SD, Swann, D, Black, AE, et al. (1998) Assessment of selective under-reporting of food intake by both obese and non-obese women in a metabolic facility. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 22, 303311.
5. Rosell, MS, Hellenius, MLB, De Faire, UH, et al. (2003) Associations between diet and the metabolic syndrome vary with the validity of dietary intake data. Am J Clin Nutr 78, 8490.
6. Livingstone, MBE & Robson, PJ (2000) Measurement of dietary intake in children. Proc Nutr Soc 59, 279293.
7. Livingstone, MBE, Robson, PJ & Wallace, JMW (2004) Issues in dietary intake assessment of children and adolescents. Br J Nutr 92, Suppl. 2, S213S222.
8. Vagstrand, K, Lindroos, AK & Linne, Y (2009) Characteristics of high and low energy reporting teenagers and their relationship to low energy reporting mothers. Public Health Nutr 12, 188196.
9. Lanctot, JQ, Klesges, RC, Stockton, MB, et al. (2008) Prevalence and characteristics of energy underreporting in African-American girls. Obesity 16, 14071412.
10. Ventura, AK, Loken, E, Mitchell, DC, et al. (2006) Understanding reporting bias in the dietary recall data of 11-year-old girls. Obesity 14, 10731084.
11. Fisher, JO, Johnson, RK, Lindquist, C, et al. (2000) Influence of body composition on the accuracy of reported energy intake in children. Obes Res 8, 597603.
12. Rennie, KL, Jebb, SA, Wright, A, et al. (2005) Secular trends in under-reporting in young people. Br J Nutr 93, 241247.
13. Bandini, LG, Must, A, Cyr, H, et al. (2003) Longitudinal changes in the accuracy of reported energy intake in girls 10-15 y of age. Am J Clin Nutr 78, 480484.
14. Kimm, SY, Glynn, NW, Obarzanek, E, et al. (2006) Racial differences in correlates of misreporting of energy intake in adolescent females. Obesity 14, 156164.
15. Andersen, LF, Pollestad, ML, Jacobs, DR Jr, et al. (2005) Validation of a pre-coded food diary used among 13-year-olds: comparison of energy intake with energy expenditure. Public Health Nutr 8, 13151321.
16. Lioret, S, Touvier, M, Balin, M, et al. (2011) Characteristics of energy under-reporting in children and adolescents. Br J Nutr 105, 16711680.
17. Rangan, AM, Flood, VM & Gill, TP (2011) Misreporting of energy intake in the 2007 Australian Children’s Survey: identification, characteristics and impact of misreporters. Nutrients 3, 186199.
18. Murakami, K, McCaffrey, TA & Livingstone, MBE (2013) Dietary glycaemic index and glycaemic load in relation to food and nutrient intake and indices of body fatness in British children and adolescents. Br J Nutr 110, 15121523.
19. Murakami, K, Miyake, Y, Sasaki, S, et al. (2012) Characteristics of under- and over-reporters of energy intake among Japanese children and adolescents: the Ryukyus Child Health Study. Nutrition 28, 532538.
20. Bandini, LG, Cyr, H, Must, A, et al. (1997) Validity of reported energy intake in preadolescent girls. Am J Clin Nutr 65, Suppl. 4, 1138S1141S.
21. Kontogianni, MD, Farmaki, AE, Vidra, N, et al. (2010) Associations between lifestyle patterns and body mass index in a sample of Greek children and adolescents. J Am Diet Assoc 110, 215221.
22. Garriguet, D (2008) Under-reporting of energy intake in the Canadian Community Health Survey. Health Rep 19, 3745.
23. Forrestal, SG (2011) Energy intake misreporting among children and adolescents: a literature review. Matern Child Nutr 7, 112127.
24. Moshfegh, AJ, Rhodes, DG, Baer, DJ, et al. (2008) The US Department of Agriculture Automated Multiple-Pass Method reduces bias in the collection of energy intakes. Am J Clin Nutr 88, 324332.
25. Blanton, CA, Moshfegh, AJ, Baer, DJ, et al. (2006) The USDA Automated Multiple-Pass Method accurately estimates group total energy and nutrient intake. J Nutr 136, 25942599.
26. Conway, JM, Ingwersen, LA, Vinyard, BT, et al. (2003) Effectiveness of the US Department of Agriculture 5-step multiple-pass method in assessing food intake in obese and nonobese women. Am J Clin Nutr 77, 11711178.
27. Conway, JM, Ingwersen, LA & Moshfegh, AJ (2004) Accuracy of dietary recall using the USDA five-step multiple-pass method in men: an observational validation study. J Am Diet Assoc 104, 595603.
28. Zipf, G, Chiappa, M, Porter, KS, et al. (2013) National health and nutrition examination survey: plan and operations, 1999–2010. Vital Health Stat 1 no. 56, 137.
29. Johnson, CL, Paulose-Ram, R, Ogden, CL, et al. (2013) National health and nutrition examination survey: analytic guidelines, 1999–2010. Vital Health Stat 2 no. 161, 124.
30. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics (2014) National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. NHANES response rates and population totals. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes/response_rates_cps.htm (accessed December 2014).
31. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics (2014) National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Questionnaires, datasets, and related documentation. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes/nhanes_questionnaires.htm (accessed December 2014).
32. Kuczmarski, RJ, Ogden, CL, Guo, SS, et al. (2002) 2000 CDC Growth Charts for the United States: methods and development. Vital Health Stat 11 no. 246, 1190.
33. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics (2014) A SAS program for the 2000 CDC Growth Charts (ages 0 to<20 years). http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpao/growthcharts/resources/sas.htm (accessed December 2014).
34. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2014) Basics about childhood obesity. http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/childhood/defining.html (accessed December 2014).
35. Black, AE (2000) Critical evaluation of energy intake using the Goldberg cut-off for energy intake: basal metabolic rate. A practical guide to its calculation, use and limitations. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 24, 11191130.
36. Huang, TT, Roberts, SB, Howarth, NC, et al. (2005) Effect of screening out implausible energy intake reports on relationships between diet and BMI. Obes Res 13, 12051217.
37. Schofield, WN (1985) Predicting basal metabolic rate, new standards and review of previous work. Hum Nutr Clin Nutr 39, Suppl. 1, 541.
38. Institute of Medicine (2002) Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein and Amino Acids. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.
39. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics (2014) Continuous NHANES web tutorial. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/tutorials/Nhanes/index_continuous.htm (accessed December 2014).
40. Briefel, RR, Sempos, CT, McDowell, MA, et al. (1997) Dietary methods research in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey: underreporting of energy intake. Am J Clin Nutr 65, Suppl. 4, 1203S1209S.
41. Lutomski, JE, van den Broeck, J, Harrington, J, et al. (2011) Sociodemographic, lifestyle, mental health and dietary factors associated with direction of misreporting of energy intake. Public Health Nutr 14, 532541.
42. Ng, SW, Slining, MM & Popkin, BM (2014) Turning point for US diets? Recessionary effects or behavioral shifts in foods purchased and consumed. Am J Clin Nutr 99, 609616.
43. Ogden, CL, Carroll, MD, Kit, BK, et al. (2012) Prevalence of obesity and trends in body mass index among US children and adolescents, 1999–2010. JAMA 307, 483490.
44. Flegal, KM, Carroll, MD, Kit, BK, et al. (2012) Prevalence of obesity and trends in the distribution of body mass index among US adults, 1999–2010. JAMA 307, 491497.
45. Ogden, CL, Carroll, MD, Kit, BK, et al. (2014) Prevalence of childhood and adult obesity in the United States, 2011–2012. JAMA 311, 806814.
46. Mendez, MA, Sotres-Alvarez, D, Miles, DR, et al. (2014) Shifts in the recent distribution of energy intake among U.S. children aged 2-18 years reflect potential abatement of earlier declining trends. J Nutr 144, 12911297.
47. Troiano, RP, Berrigan, D, Dodd, KW, et al. (2008) Physical activity in the United States measured by accelerometer. Med Sci Sports Exerc 40, 181188.
48. Belcher, BR, Berrigan, D, Dodd, KW, et al. (2010) Physical activity in US youth: effect of race/ethnicity, age, gender, and weight status. Med Sci Sports Exerc 42, 22112221.
49. Murakami, K & Livingstone, MBE (2014) Eating frequency in relation to body mass index and waist circumference in British adults. Int J Obes 38, 12001206.

Keywords

Type Description Title
PDF
Supplementary materials

Murakami and Livingstone supplementary material S1
Murakami and Livingstone supplementary material

 PDF (54 KB)
54 KB

Prevalence and characteristics of misreporting of energy intake in US children and adolescents: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003–2012

  • Kentaro Murakami (a1) and M. Barbara E. Livingstone (a2)

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed