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A provisional database for the silicon content of foods in the United Kingdom

  • J. J. Powell (a1) (a2) (a3), S. A. McNaughton (a3), R. Jugdaohsingh (a1), S. H. C. Anderson (a1), J. Dear (a2), F. Khot (a2), L. Mowatt (a1), K. L. Gleason (a2), M. Sykes (a2), R. P. H. Thompson (a1), C. Bolton-Smith (a3) and M. J. Hodson (a4)...
Abstract

Si may play an important role in bone formation and connective tissue metabolism. Although biological interest in this element has recently increased, limited literature exists on the Si content of foods. To further our knowledge and understanding of the relationship between dietary Si and human health, a reliable food composition database, relevant for the UK population, is required. A total of 207 foods and beverages, commonly consumed in the UK, were analysed for Si content. Composite samples were analysed using inductively coupled plasma–optical emission spectrometry following microwave-assisted digestion with nitric acid and H2O2. The highest concentrations of Si were found in cereals and cereal products, especially less refined cereals and oat-based products. Fruit and vegetables were highly variable sources of Si with substantial amounts present in Kenyan beans, French beans, runner beans, spinach, dried fruit, bananas and red lentils, but undetectable amounts in tomatoes, oranges and onions. Of the beverages, beer, a macerated whole-grain cereal product, contained the greatest level of Si, whilst drinking water was a variable source with some mineral waters relatively high in Si. The present study provides a provisional database for the Si content of UK foods, which will allow the estimation of dietary intakes of Si in the UK population and investigation into the role of dietary Si in human health.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Dr Jonathan J. Powell, fax +44 1223 437515, email Jonathan.Powell@mrc-hnr.cam.ac.uk
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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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