Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa
  • Access
  • Cited by 60
  • Cited by
    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Jonker, Arjan and Yu, Peiqiang 2016. The Role of Proanthocyanidins Complex in Structure and Nutrition Interaction in Alfalfa Forage. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, Vol. 17, Issue. 5, p. 793.


    Beecher, M. Hennessy, D. Boland, T.M. McEvoy, M. O'Donovan, M. and Lewis, E. 2015. The variation in morphology of perennial ryegrass cultivars throughout the grazing season and effects on organic matter digestibility. Grass and Forage Science, Vol. 70, Issue. 1, p. 19.


    Phelan, P. Moloney, A. P. McGeough, E. J. Humphreys, J. Bertilsson, J. O’Riordan, E. G. and O’Kiely, P. 2015. Forage Legumes for Grazing and Conserving in Ruminant Production Systems. Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences, Vol. 34, Issue. 1-3, p. 281.


    Enriquez-Hidalgo, D. Gilliland, T. Deighton, M.H. O’Donovan, M. and Hennessy, D. 2014. Milk production and enteric methane emissions by dairy cows grazing fertilized perennial ryegrass pasture with or without inclusion of white clover. Journal of Dairy Science, Vol. 97, Issue. 3, p. 1400.


    Enriquez-Hidalgo, D. Hennessy, D. Gilliland, T. Egan, M. Mee, J.F. and Lewis, E. 2014. Effect of rotationally grazing perennial ryegrass white clover or perennial ryegrass only swards on dairy cow feeding behaviour, rumen characteristics and sward depletion patterns. Livestock Science, Vol. 169, p. 48.


    Lüscher, A. Mueller-Harvey, I. Soussana, J. F. Rees, R. M. and Peyraud, J. L. 2014. Potential of legume-based grassland-livestock systems in Europe: a review. Grass and Forage Science, Vol. 69, Issue. 2, p. 206.


    Yu, Peiqiang Gamage, Inoka H. and Zhang, Xuewei 2014. New Approaches and Recent Advances on Characterization of Chemical Functional Groups and Structures, Physiochemical Property, and Nutritional Values in Feedstocks and By-Products: Advanced Spectroanalytical and Modeling Investigations. Applied Spectroscopy Reviews, Vol. 49, Issue. 7, p. 585.


    Hammond, K.J. Burke, J.L. Koolaard, J.P. Muetzel, S. Pinares-Patiño, C.S. and Waghorn, G.C. 2013. Effects of feed intake on enteric methane emissions from sheep fed fresh white clover (Trifolium repens) and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) forages. Animal Feed Science and Technology, Vol. 179, Issue. 1-4, p. 121.


    Purcell, P. J. Grant, J. Boland, T. M. Grogan, D. and O'Kiely, P. 2012. The in vitro rumen methane output of perennial grass species and white clover varieties, and associative effects for their binary mixtures, evaluated using a batch-culture technique. Animal Production Science, Vol. 52, Issue. 12, p. 1077.


    Hammond, K.J. Hoskin, S.O. Burke, J.L. Waghorn, G.C. Koolaard, J.P. and Muetzel, S. 2011. Effects of feeding fresh white clover (Trifolium repens) or perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) on enteric methane emissions from sheep. Animal Feed Science and Technology, Vol. 166-167, p. 398.


    DHANOA, M. S. LÓPEZ, S. SANDERSON, R. and FRANCE, J. 2009. Simplified estimation of forage degradability in the rumen assuming zero-order degradation kinetics. The Journal of Agricultural Science, Vol. 147, Issue. 03, p. 225.


    Lee, M.R.F. Theobald, V.J. Tweed, J.K.S. Winters, A.L. and Scollan, N.D. 2009. Effect of feeding fresh or conditioned red clover on milk fatty acids and nitrogen utilization in lactating dairy cows. Journal of Dairy Science, Vol. 92, Issue. 3, p. 1136.


    Vranić, Marina Knežević, M. Bošnjak, K. Leto, J. Perčulija, G. and Matić, I. 2008. Effects of replacing grass silage harvested at two maturity stages with maize silage in the ration upon the intake, digestibility and N retention in wether sheep. Livestock Science, Vol. 114, Issue. 1, p. 84.


    Beever, D. E. and Doyle, P. T. 2007. Feed conversion efficiency as a key determinant of dairy herd performance: a review. Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture, Vol. 47, Issue. 6, p. 645.


    Knežević, Mladen Vranić, Marina Bošnjak, Krešimir Grbeša, Darko Perčulija, Goran Leto, Josip and Kutnjak, Hrvoje 2007. Effects of inclusion of maize silage in a diet based on grass silage on the intake, apparent digestibility and nitrogen retention in wether sheep. Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture, Vol. 47, Issue. 12, p. 1408.


    Cohen, D. C. Stockdale, C. R. and Doyle, P. T. 2006. Feeding an energy supplement with white clover silage improves rumen fermentation, metabolisable protein utilisation, and milk production in dairy cows. Australian Journal of Agricultural Research, Vol. 57, Issue. 4, p. 367.


    Gehman, A.M. Bertrand, J.A. Jenkins, T.C. and Pinkerton, B.W. 2006. The Effect of Carbohydrate Source on Nitrogen Capture in Dairy Cows on Pasture. Journal of Dairy Science, Vol. 89, Issue. 7, p. 2659.


    Schönhusen, U and Voigt, J 2004. Ruminal degradability of15N labelled ribonucleic acid in grass. Archives of Animal Nutrition, Vol. 58, Issue. 5, p. 343.


    Younge, B.A Murphy, J.J and Rath, M 2004. Nutrient metabolism in the rumen and milk production in cows fed on grass-silage and fresh grass based diets. Livestock Production Science, Vol. 88, Issue. 1-2, p. 43.


    Dewhurst, R.J. Evans, R.T. Scollan, N.D. Moorby, J.M. Merry, R.J. and Wilkins, R.J. 2003. Comparison of Grass and Legume Silages for Milk Production. 2. In Vivo and In Sacco Evaluations of Rumen Function. Journal of Dairy Science, Vol. 86, Issue. 8, p. 2612.


    ×

The effect of forage species and stage of harvest on the processes of digestion occurring in the rumen of cattle

  • D. E. Beever (a1), M. S. Dhanoa (a1), H. R. Losada (a1), R. T. Evans (a1), S. B. Cammell (a1) and J. France (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1079/BJN19860124
  • Published online: 01 March 2007
Abstract

1. Pure swards of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. cv. Melle) or white clover (Trifolium repens L. cv. Blanca) were harvested daily as either primary growth (May-June) or mid- (July) and late- (August-September) season 4-week regrowths and offered to Friesian steers at two levels of feed allowance (18 and 24 g dry matter (DM)/kg live weight), to examine the effect of forage species and stage of harvest on nutrient digestion and supply.

2. The early- and mid-season grasses had low nitrogen (23 g/kg DM) and high water-soluble carbohydrate (169 g/kg) contents whilst the late-season grass had a higher N content (28 g/kg). All clover diets had high N (average 45 g/kg) and low water-soluble carbohydrate (89 g/kg) contents, and DM digestibility on all diets ranged from 0.77 to 0.83 (mean of two feeding levels).

3. Mean total rumen volatile fatty acid concentrations were significantly (P < 0.001) higher on the clover diets, whilst on the grass diets molar proportions of propionate showed a slight but not significant decline with advancing season and tended to be higher than those on the clover diets. Mean rumen ammonia concentrations were significantly (P < 0.001) lower on the early- and mid-season grasses (59 mg NH3-N/1) than the late-season grass (242 mg/l) and early-season clover (283 mg/l) which were all significantly (P < 0.01) lower than the mid-and late-season clovers (372 and 590 mg/l) respectively.

4. Rates of organic matter (OM) and N digestion in the rumen were estimated using established nylon-bag techniques and found to be high on all diets, but significant effects due to forage species (clover > grass; P < 0.001) were detected, whilst overall potential degradability in the rumen exceeded 0.89 for both OM and N on all diets.

5. Significantly (P < 0.001) more OM entered the small intestine of calves fed on white clover (10.2 g/kg live weight) than those fed on ryegrass (8.33 g/kg) and similar effects due to level of feeding (g/kg; low 7.9, high 10.6; P < 0.05) and stage of harvest (g/kg; early 8.3 v. mid 10.0, late 9.50; P < 0.05) were also detected. Non-NH3-N (NAN) flow (g/kg) to the small intestine was increased by forage species (grass 0.56, clover 0.69; P < 0.05) and stage of harvest (early 0.59 v. mid 0.65, late 0.64; P > 0.05) whilst NAN flow/N intake ranged from 0.96 to 1.65 g/g (mean 1.25) on the grass diets and from 0.64 to 0.84 g/g (mean 0.75) on the clovers (P < 0001).

6. Microbial N flow to the small intestine averaged 0.72 of duodenal NAN (grass 0.76, clover 0.69). Efficiency of microbial N synthesis was high on all diets, (g/kg OM truly digested in the rumen; grass 33.5, clover 36.3), as was the estimated extent of in vivo feed N degradation (g/g N intake; grass 0.75, clover 0.79).

7. A model is described to simulate the progress curves of the ratio, degraded N:degraded OM in the rumen for the six diets, using indices obtained in the present study. The results are ratified with the in vivo observations of N utilization in the rumen for the grass and clover diets.

8. It is concluded that both forage species and stage of harvest can significantly influence the processes of rumen digestion and nutrient supply, but with the fresh forages examined in the present study, it would appear that the processes of digestion in the rumen greatly outweighed the passage of potentially digestible nutrients from the rumen.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      The effect of forage species and stage of harvest on the processes of digestion occurring in the rumen of cattle
      Your Kindle email address
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      The effect of forage species and stage of harvest on the processes of digestion occurring in the rumen of cattle
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      The effect of forage species and stage of harvest on the processes of digestion occurring in the rumen of cattle
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

D. E. Beever , H. R. Losada , S. B. Cammell , R. T. Evans & M. J. Haines (1986). British Journal of Nutrition 56, 209225.

C. J. F. Harrop (1974). Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge 83, 249257.

E. R. Ørskov & I. McDonald (1979). Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge 92, 499503.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×