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Targeted outdoor residual spraying, autodissemination devices and their combination against Aedes mosquitoes: field implementation in a Malaysian urban setting

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 May 2020

Nurulhusna Ab Hamid
Affiliation:
Medical Entomology Unit, Institute for Medical Research, WHO Collaborating Centre, Institute for Medical Research, Ministry of Health Malaysia, Jalan Pahang, 50588Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Neal Alexander
Affiliation:
MRC Tropical Epidemiology Group, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel St, London, WC1E 7HT, United Kingdom
Remco Suer
Affiliation:
In2Care B.V., Marijkeweg 22, 6871SE Wageningen, the Netherlands
Nazni Wasi Ahmed
Affiliation:
Medical Entomology Unit, Institute for Medical Research, WHO Collaborating Centre, Institute for Medical Research, Ministry of Health Malaysia, Jalan Pahang, 50588Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Rose Nani Mudin
Affiliation:
Vector Borne Disease Sector, Disease Control Division, Federal Government Administrative Center, Ministry of Health Malaysia, Level 4, Block E10, Complex E, 62590Putrajaya, Malaysia
Topek Omar
Affiliation:
Vector Borne Disease Sector, Disease Control Division, Federal Government Administrative Center, Ministry of Health Malaysia, Level 4, Block E10, Complex E, 62590Putrajaya, Malaysia
Rahmat Dapari
Affiliation:
Vector Borne Disease Sector, Disease Control Division, Federal Government Administrative Center, Ministry of Health Malaysia, Level 4, Block E10, Complex E, 62590Putrajaya, Malaysia
Shahrom Nor Azian Che Mat Din
Affiliation:
Public Health Division, Johor, Johor State Health Department, Ministry of Health Malaysia, Jalan Persiaran Permai, 81200Johor Bahru Johor, Malaysia
Roslinda Abdul Rahman
Affiliation:
Public Health Division, Johor, Johor State Health Department, Ministry of Health Malaysia, Jalan Persiaran Permai, 81200Johor Bahru Johor, Malaysia
Ropiah Jaraee
Affiliation:
Entomology and Pest Unit Public Health Division, Johor, Johor State Health Department, Ministry of Health Malaysia, Jalan Persiaran Permai, 81200Johor Bahru Johor, Malaysia
Frederic Baur
Affiliation:
Bayer S.A.S, Environmental Science, Crop Science Division, 16 rue Jean Marie Leclair; 69266 Lyon Cedex 09, France
Frederic Schmitt
Affiliation:
Bayer S.A.S, Environmental Science, Crop Science Division, 16 rue Jean Marie Leclair; 69266 Lyon Cedex 09, France
Nick Hamon
Affiliation:
Innovative Vector Control Consortium, Pembroke Place, L3 5QA, Liverpool, UK
Jason H. Richardson
Affiliation:
Innovative Vector Control Consortium, Pembroke Place, L3 5QA, Liverpool, UK
Carole Langlois-Jacques
Affiliation:
Hospices Civils de Lyon, Service de Biostatistique et Bioinformatique, F-69003 Lyon, France; Université de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon, France; Université Lyon 1, F-69100 Villeurbanne, France; CNRS, UMR 5558, Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive, Equipe Biostatistique-Santé, F-69100Villeurbanne, France
Muriel Rabilloud
Affiliation:
Hospices Civils de Lyon, Service de Biostatistique et Bioinformatique, F-69003 Lyon, France; Université de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon, France; Université Lyon 1, F-69100 Villeurbanne, France; CNRS, UMR 5558, Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive, Equipe Biostatistique-Santé, F-69100Villeurbanne, France
Mitra Saadatian-Elahi*
Affiliation:
Service d'Hygiène, Epidémiologie et Prévention, Hospices Civils de Lyon, F-69437Lyon, France and Laboratoire des Pathogènes Emergents – Fondation Mérieux, Centre International de Recherche en Infectiologie, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale U1111, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR5308, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 21, Avenue Tony Garnier, 69007Lyon, France
*
Author for correspondence: Mitra Saadatian Elahi, Email: mitra.elahi@chu-lyon.fr

Abstract

Currently, dengue control relies largely on reactive vector control programmes. Proactive vector-control using a rational, well-balanced integrated vector management approach may prove more successful for dengue control. As part of the development of a cluster randomized controlled epidemiological trial, a study was conducted in Johor Bahru, Malaysia. The study included one control site (three buildings) and three intervention sites which were treated as follows: targeted outdoor residual spraying only (TORS site, two buildings); deployment of autodissemination devices only (ADD site, four buildings); and the previous two treatments combined (TORS + ADD site, three buildings). The primary entomological measurement was per cent of positive ovitraps—ovitrap index (OI). The effect of each intervention on OI was analyzed by a modified ordinary least squares regression model. Relative to the control site, the TORS and ADD sites showed a reduction in the Aedes OI (−6.5%, P = 0.04 and −8.3%, P = 0.10, respectively). Analysis by species showed that, relative to control, the Ae. aegypti OI was lower in ADD (−8.9%, P = 0.03) and in TORS (−10.4%, P = 0.02). No such effect was evident in the TORS + ADD site. The present study provides insights into the methods to be used for the main trial. The combination of multiple insecticides with different modes of action in one package is innovative, although we could not demonstrate the additive effect of TORS + ADD. Further work is required to strengthen our understanding of how these interventions impact dengue vector populations and dengue transmission.

Type
Research Paper
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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Footnotes

The original version of this article was published with one incorrect author name. A notice detailing this has been published and the error rectified in the online and print PDF and HTML copies.

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