Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Jobs and Computers: Information technology training for long-term day hospital patients

  • Maurice Lipsedge (a1), Angela B. Summerfield (a2), G. Lazzari (a3) and M. van Beeston (a3)
Extract

This is a report on a project which offers long-term day hospital patients a training which will lead to paid employment on the open market. Lack of work compounds the low self-esteem of chronic psychiatric patients. They experience multiple disadvantages, including loss of status, purpose, personal identity, social contacts outside the family, and a time structure to the day. Many of these disadvantages are known to be experienced by unemployed people in the general population. In most surveys, a fifth of the unemployed report a deterioration in their mental health since being unemployed, with an increased frequency of deterioration proportional to length of time without work. Work enhances self-esteem by decreasing the degree of dependency and by allowing identification with non-patients and may influence perceived locus of control. Work provides social participation and is ‘a visible measure of normality’ for former patients.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Jobs and Computers
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Jobs and Computers
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Jobs and Computers
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
Hide All
1. Jahoda, M. (1982) Employment and Unemployment, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
2. Jackson, P. R. & Warr, P. B. (1984) Unemployment and psychological illhealth: the moderating role of duration and age. Psychological Medicine 14, 605614.
3. Olshanksy, S. & Unterberger, H. (1963) The meaning of work and its implication for the ex-mental hospital patient. Journal of Mental Hygiene, 45, 139149.
4. Rotter, J. (1966) Generalised expectancies for internal vs. external control of reinforcement. Psychological Monographs, 80, (1, whole, no. 609).
5. Seligman, M. E. P. (1975) Helplessness: on Depression, Development & Death. San Francisco: W. H. Freeman.
6. Beck, A. T. (1976) Cognitive Therapy and the Emotional Disorders. New York: International Universities Press.
7. Bennett, D. H. (1972) Day hospitals, day centres and workshops: general principles. In Non-residential services for the mentally ill: 1964–1971. In Evaluating a Community Psychiatric Service: The Camberwell Register 1964–71, (eds. Wing, J. K. & Hailey, A. M.). London: Oxford University Press.
8. Bennett, D. H. (1978) Social forms of psychiatric treatment. In Schizophrenia: Towards a New Synthesis. (ed. Wing, J. K.). London: Academic Press.
9. Chapanis, A. (1982) Computers and the common man. In Houston Symposium, 3, Information Technology and Psychology, Prospects for the Future. New York: Praeger.
10. Breakwell, G. M., Fife-Shaw, G., Lee, T. & Spence, J. (1986) Attitudes to new technology in relation to social beliefs and group memberships. Unpublished paper. University of Surrey.
11. Beck, A. T., Ward, C. H., Mendelson, M., Mock, J. & Erbaugh, J. (1961) An inventory for measuring depression. Archives of General Psychiatry 4, 561571.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0140-0789
  • EISSN: 2514-9954
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 12 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 59 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 2nd January 2018 - 17th June 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Jobs and Computers: Information technology training for long-term day hospital patients

  • Maurice Lipsedge (a1), Angela B. Summerfield (a2), G. Lazzari (a3) and M. van Beeston (a3)
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *