Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-bkjnw Total loading time: 0.615 Render date: 2021-10-22T23:52:59.471Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Growth Alliances: Insights from Egypt

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Abla Abdel-Latif
Affiliation:
American University in Cairo
Hubert Schmitz
Affiliation:
Institute of Development Studies

Abstract

Recent research has shown that alliances between policy makers and investors can be very effective in enhancing investment and growth. Drawing on the case of Egypt, this paper asks where such growth alliances come from, how they evolve over time, what their key features are, how they work, in what circumstances they do good rather than harm, and whether they can be constructed for policy purposes.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © V.K. Aggarwal 2010 and published under exclusive license to Cambridge University Press 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Abdel-Latif, Abla. 2007. A Conceptual Framework for Common Interest between Policy Makers and Key Investors (CIPI): Research on the Politics of Productive Investment in Egypt. Unpublished manuscript, Centre for the Future State, Institute of Development Studies, Brighton.Google Scholar
Abdel-Latif, Abla and Schmitz, Hubert. 2009. State-Business Relations and Investment in Egypt. IDS Research Report 61. Brighton: Institute of Development Studies.Google Scholar
Abdel-Latif, Abla and Schmitz, Hubert. 2011. “The Politics of Investment and Growth in Egypt: Experimenting with a New Approach.” Development Policy Review, forthcoming.Google Scholar
Adly, Amr Ismail. 2009. “Politically-Embedded Cronyism: the Case of Post-Liberalization Egypt.” Business and Politics 11 (4): 126.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Amsden, Alice. 1989. Asia's Next Giant: South Korea and Late Industrialization. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Brautigam, Deborah, Rakner, Lise and Taylor, Scott. 2002. “Business Associations and Growth Coalitions in Sub-Saharan Africa.” Journal of Modern African Studies 40 (4): 519–47.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Doner, Richard F. and Schneider, Ben R. 2000. “Business Associations and Economic Development: Why Some Associations Contribute More Than Others.” Business and Politics 2 (3): 261–88.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
El-Mezlawy, Sarah. 2006. Investment Policy in Egypt: Obstacles to Implementation. Unpublished manuscript, Policy Paper for MA Governance and Development, Institute of Development Studies, Brighton.Google Scholar
Evans, Peter. 1995. Embedded Autonomy: States and Industrial Transformation. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Grindle, Merilee. 2000. Designing Reforms: Problems, Solutions, and Politics. Faculty Research Working Paper Series RWP01-020. John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.Google Scholar
Haber, Stephen. 2002. Crony Capitalism and Economic Growth in Latin America: Theory and Evidence. Stanford: Hoover Institution Press.Google Scholar
Handoussa, Heba, El Oraby, Nivine, Nour El Din, Diaa, Abou Shnief, Heba and Bahaa El Din, Ziad. 2003. Study on Creating an Enabling Business Environment in Egypt. Unpublished manuscript, Industrial Modernization Center, Cairo.Google Scholar
Haggard, Stephan M. 1998. “Business, Politics and Policy in East and Southeast Asia.” In Behind East Asian Growth – The Political and Social Foundations of Prosperity, edited by Rowen, Henry S. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Hutchroft, Paul D. 1998. Booty Capitalism. The Politics of Banking in the Philippines. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
Kelsall, Tim and Booth, David. with Cooksey, Brian. 2009. Developmental Patrimonialism? The Management of Clientelist Crises and Business-Politics Relations. Unpublished manuscript, Africa Power and Politics Programme.Google Scholar
Krueger, Anne O. 1974. “The Political Economy of the Rent-Seeking Society.” American Economic Review 64 (June): 291303.Google Scholar
Leftwich, Adrian. 2009. Bringing Agency Back in: Politics and Human Agency in Building Institutions and States. Synthesis and Overview Report of Phase One of The Leaders, Elites and Coalitions Research Programme, Research Paper 06. Department of Politics, University of York.Google Scholar
Moore, Mick and Schmitz, Hubert. 2008. Idealism, Realism and the Investment Climate in Developing Countries. IDS Working Paper 307, Brighton: Institute of Development Studies.Google Scholar
Sakr, Fathi. 2003. Physical Capital and Challenges of Rapid Growth. Unpublished manuscript, Industrial Modernization Center, Cairo.Google Scholar
Schneider, Ben R. 2004. “Organizing Interests and Coalitions in the Politics of Market Reform in Latin America.” World Politics 56: 456–79.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schneider, Ben R. and Maxfield, Sylvia. 1997. “Business, the State, and Economic Performance in Developing Countries.” In Business and the State in Developing Countries, edited by Maxfield, Sylvia and Schneider, Ben R. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
Sen, Kunal and Willem te Velde, Dirk. 2009. “State Business Relations and Economic Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa.” Journal of Development Studies 45 (8): 1267–83.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shafer, Michael. 1997. “The Political Economy of Sectors and Sectoral Change: Korea Then and Now.” In Business and the State in Developing Countries, edited by Maxfield, Sylvia and Schneider, Ben R. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
Waterbury, John. 1992. “The Heart of the Matter?” In The Politics of Economic Adjustment, edited by Haggard, Stephan and Kaufman, Robert. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Yousfi, Hela and Humphrey, John. 2008. The Investment Climate in Egypt: Institutions or Relationships as Conditions for Sustainable Reform? Working Paper 66. Paris: Agence Française de Développement.Google Scholar
17
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Growth Alliances: Insights from Egypt
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Growth Alliances: Insights from Egypt
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Growth Alliances: Insights from Egypt
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *