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Why Some Things Should Not Be For Sale: The Moral Limits of Markets, by Debra Satz. Oxford University Press, 2010.

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 January 2015

Rutger Claassen*
Affiliation:
Leiden University

Abstract

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Type
Book Reviews
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Business Ethics 2012

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References

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