Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa
  • Access
  • Cited by 7
  • Cited by
    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Vaesen, Krist Collard, Mark Cosgrove, Richard and Roebroeks, Wil 2016. Population size does not explain past changes in cultural complexity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, Issue. 16, p. E2241.


    Clarkson, Chris Smith, Mike Marwick, Ben Fullagar, Richard Wallis, Lynley A. Faulkner, Patrick Manne, Tiina Hayes, Elspeth Roberts, Richard G. Jacobs, Zenobia Carah, Xavier Lowe, Kelsey M. Matthews, Jacqueline and Florin, S. Anna 2015. The archaeology, chronology and stratigraphy of Madjedbebe (Malakunanja II): A site in northern Australia with early occupation. Journal of Human Evolution, Vol. 83, p. 46.


    Fullagar, Richard Hayes, Elspeth Stephenson, Birgitta Field, Judith Matheson, Carney Stern, Nicola and Fitzsimmons, Kathryn 2015. Evidence for Pleistocene seed grinding at Lake Mungo, south-eastern Australia. Archaeology in Oceania, Vol. 50, p. 3.


    Pawlik, Alfred F. Piper, Philip J. Wood, Rachel E. Lim, Kristine Kate A. Faylona, Marie Grace Pamela G. Mijares, Armand Salvador B. and Porr, Martin 2015. Shell tool technology in Island Southeast Asia: an early Middle Holocene Tridacna adze from Ilin Island, Mindoro, Philippines. Antiquity, Vol. 89, Issue. 344, p. 292.


    Dubreuil, Laure and Savage, Daniel 2014. Ground stones: a synthesis of the use-wear approach. Journal of Archaeological Science, Vol. 48, p. 139.


    David, Bruno Barker, Bryce Petchey, Fiona Delannoy, Jean-Jacques Geneste, Jean-Michel Rowe, Cassandra Eccleston, Mark Lamb, Lara and Whear, Ray 2013. A 28,000 year old excavated painted rock from Nawarla Gabarnmang, northern Australia. Journal of Archaeological Science, Vol. 40, Issue. 5, p. 2493.


    Delannoy, Jean-Jacques David, Bruno Geneste, Jean-Michel Katherine, Margaret Barker, Bryce Whear, Ray L. and Gunn, Robert G. 2013. The social construction of caves and rockshelters: Chauvet Cave (France) and Nawarla Gabarnmang (Australia). Antiquity, Vol. 87, Issue. 335, p. 12.


    ×

The Origins of Ground-edge Axes: New Findings from Nawarla Gabarnmang, Arnhem Land (Australia) and Global Implications for the Evolution of Fully Modern Humans

  • Jean-Michel Geneste (a1), Bruno David (a2), Hugues Plisson (a3), Jean-Jacques Delannoy (a4) and Fiona Petchey (a5)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0959774312000017
  • Published online: 01 February 2012
Abstract

The grinding of stone to make sharp cutting edges did not evolve with the emergence of biologically modern humans in Africa, but late in the Pleistocene at the completion or nearcompletion of the Out-of-Africa 2 migration. Here we discuss the earliest securely-dated fragment of ground-edge axe from Australia, dated at 35,500 cal. bp, an age slightly older or comparable to the earliest ages for edge-grinding from the Pacific Ocean's western seaboard. In this region ground-edge axes did not evolve with the emergence of agriculture, nor for the clearance of forests, but, rather, as socially mediated technology, part of the development of symbolic storage that is the hallmark of the evolution of cognitively modern humans at the geographical end, during, or following, Out-of-Africa 2.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      The Origins of Ground-edge Axes: New Findings from Nawarla Gabarnmang, Arnhem Land (Australia) and Global Implications for the Evolution of Fully Modern Humans
      Your Kindle email address
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      The Origins of Ground-edge Axes: New Findings from Nawarla Gabarnmang, Arnhem Land (Australia) and Global Implications for the Evolution of Fully Modern Humans
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      The Origins of Ground-edge Axes: New Findings from Nawarla Gabarnmang, Arnhem Land (Australia) and Global Implications for the Evolution of Fully Modern Humans
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Cambridge Archaeological Journal
  • ISSN: 0959-7743
  • EISSN: 1474-0540
  • URL: /core/journals/cambridge-archaeological-journal
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×