Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa
  • Get access
    Check if you have access via personal or institutional login
  • Cited by 8
  • Cited by
    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Arman, Samuel D. and Prideaux, Gavin J. 2016. Behaviour of the Pleistocene marsupial lion deduced from claw marks in a southwestern Australian cave. Scientific Reports, Vol. 6, p. 21372.


    Fritz, Carole Tosello, Gilles and Conkey, Margaret W. 2015. Reflections on the Identities and Roles of the Artists in European Paleolithic Societies. Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory,


    Gelder, Leslie Van 2015. The Role of Children in the Creation of Finger Flutings in Koonalda Cave, South Australia. Childhood in the Past, Vol. 8, Issue. 2, p. 149.


    Van Gelder, Leslie 2015. Counting the Children: The Role of Children in the Production of Finger Flutings in Four Upper Palaeolithic Caves. Oxford Journal of Archaeology, Vol. 34, Issue. 2, p. 119.


    Nowell, April and Chang, Melanie L. 2014. Science, the Media, and Interpretations of Upper Paleolithic Figurines. American Anthropologist, Vol. 116, Issue. 3, p. 562.


    Moro Abadía, Oscar and González Morales, Manuel R. 2013. Paleolithic Art: A Cultural History. Journal of Archaeological Research, Vol. 21, Issue. 3, p. 269.


    Sharpe, Kevin and Van Gelder, Leslie 2009. Paleolithic finger flutings as efficient communication: Applying Zipf's Law to two panels in Rouffignac Cave, France. Semiotica, Vol. 2009, Issue. 177,


    VAN GELDER, LESLIE and SHARPE, KEVIN 2009. WOMEN AND GIRLS AS UPPER PALAEOLITHIC CAVE ‘ARTISTS’: DECIPHERING THE SEXES OF FINGER FLUTERS IN ROUFFIGNAC CAVE. Oxford Journal of Archaeology, Vol. 28, Issue. 4, p. 323.


    ×

The Study of Finger Flutings

  • Kevin Sharpe (a1) (a2) and Leslie Van Gelder (a3)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0959774306000175
  • Published online: 20 September 2006
Abstract

Archaeologists have usually glossed over parietal finger flutings, especially non-figurative and non-symbolic lines. This article develops a nomenclature and defines four forms to provide a descriptive structure from which to build analyses. It then develops methods for such investigations, using experiments and studies of physiology to derive information about the fluters from the flutings. The methods are applied to each of the four forms of fluting, showing which approaches may be most useful for each form. Broader questions and applications are touched on, including approaches to meaning, figures, and other families of parietal markings such as hand stencils. This approach to flutings augments other approaches to prehistoric ‘art’ by seeking to know about the artists themselves, their gender, age, size, handedness, and the number of individuals involved in creating a panel.

Copyright
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Cambridge Archaeological Journal
  • ISSN: 0959-7743
  • EISSN: 1474-0540
  • URL: /core/journals/cambridge-archaeological-journal
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords: