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Activity of flying beetles (Coleoptera) at two heights in canopy gaps and intact forests in a hardwood forest in Quebec

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 April 2012

Briana Schroeder
Affiliation:
Department of Natural Resource Sciences, McGill University, Macdonald Campus, 21 111 Lakeshore Road, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec, Canada H9X 3V9
Christopher M. Buddle*
Affiliation:
Department of Natural Resource Sciences, McGill University, Macdonald Campus, 21 111 Lakeshore Road, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec, Canada H9X 3V9
Michel Saint-Germain
Affiliation:
Department of Natural Resource Sciences, McGill University, Macdonald Campus, 21 111 Lakeshore Road, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec, Canada H9X 3V9
*
1Corresponding author (e-mail: chris.buddle@mcgill.ca).

Abstract

We studied the effects of forest height and forest gap on assemblages of flying beetles in an American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. (Fagaceae) – sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh. (Aceraceae)) forest in Quebec. From June until August of 2005, beetles were collected in Lindgren funnel traps placed in the canopy (20–25 m height) and upper understorey (3–5 m height) in proximity to five forest gaps (15–30 m in diameter) (at the edge of the forest opening or within the closed-canopy forest). We collected 1852 beetles representing 38 families and 172 species. Based on rarefaction curves, species richness was significantly higher in the canopy than in the upper understorey. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling ordination revealed a change in species composition in relation to vertical stratification but not to the forest gaps. Our findings confirmed the importance of the vertical forest gradient to overall diversity of forest coleopterans.

Résumé

Nous avons étudié les effets de l'ouverture et de la structure verticale du couvert forestier sur la structure des assemblages de Coléoptères dans une hêtraie (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh., Fagaceae) – érable à sucre (Acer saccharum Marsh., Aceraceae) au Québec. Les Coléoptères ont été échantillonnés à l'aide de pièges Lindgren positionnés dans la canopée (20–25 m de hauteur) et en sous-couvert (5 m de hauteur) à proximité de 5 trouées de 15–30 m de diamètre (en bordure de la trouée versus forêt d'intérieur) et ce du début juin à la fin d'août 2005; 1852 individus appartenant à 172 espèces et 41 familles ont été collectés. La richesse spécifique, estimée à l'aide de courbes de raréfaction, s'est montrée plus élevée dans la canopée. Un cadrage non -métrique multidimensionel a démontré un changement au niveau de la composition spécifique en lien avec la position verticale des pièges, mais non au niveau de la proximité aux trouées. Notre étude confirme que la diversité structurelle fournie par le gradient vertical en forêt contribue de façon importante à la diversité des Coléoptères en milieu forestier.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 2009

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References

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