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Shedding new light upon circadian emergence rhythmicity in the mountain pine beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 April 2019

Debra L. Wertman*
Affiliation:
Department of Biology, University of Victoria, Cunningham Building, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, British Columbia, V8P 5C2, Canada; and Pacific Forestry Centre, Natural Resources Canada – Canadian Forest Service, 506 W Burnside Road, Victoria, British Columbia, V8Z 1M5, Canada Pacific Forestry Centre, Natural Resources Canada – Canadian Forest Service, 506 W Burnside Road, Victoria, British Columbia, V8Z 1M5, Canada
Katherine P. Bleiker
Affiliation:
Pacific Forestry Centre, Natural Resources Canada – Canadian Forest Service, 506 W Burnside Road, Victoria, British Columbia, V8Z 1M5, Canada
*
2Corresponding author (e-mail: dwertman@uvic.ca)

Abstract

The phenological behaviours of temperate insects can be highly controlled by photoperiod. Some foundational studies of the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae (Hopkins) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), documented a diurnal emergence rhythm that was asynchronous with maximum daily temperatures in the field and persisted under constant temperature and light conditions. In the 1970s, researchers hypothesised that this emergence rhythm was regulated by an endogenous circadian mechanism. Reflecting upon these historical data, we consider that a diurnal pattern of D. ponderosae emergence may result from photoperiodic entrainment of the circadian clock during the immature stages. Mechanistically, we suggest that the long-wavelength-sensitive opsin that we previously found to be expressed across D. ponderosae life stages could mediate, from beneath the bark, the input of light–dark cycle cues that are usually required for entrainment of the insect circadian clock.

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Copyright
© Entomological Society of Canada 2019 

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Footnotes

1

Present address: Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences, Forest Sciences Centre, University of British Columbia, 3041 – 2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 1Z4, Canada.

Subject editor: Therese Poland

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Shedding new light upon circadian emergence rhythmicity in the mountain pine beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)
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