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Infant Strangulation from an Amber Teething Necklace

  • Catherine Cox (a1), Neil Petrie (a2) and Katrina F. Hurley (a2)

Abstract

Amber teething necklaces supposedly provide analgesia for teething infants. Their use is becoming more widespread, despite lack of peer-reviewed evidence and warnings from Health Canada that they pose a strangulation and aspiration risk. To date, there have been no published reports of strangulation secondary to amber teething necklaces. In this report we present a case of non-fatal infant strangulation from the first time use of an amber teething necklace. We will also discuss the role of physicians as advocates in reporting similar cases and educating families. Finally, we will comment on the responsibility of all professionals and professional organizations that work with infants and toddlers to advocate for children by raising concerns and counselling parents.

Les colliers d’ambre pour dentition auraient des propriétés analgésiques chez les nourrissons. Leur utilisation gagne de plus en plus de terrain malgré le manque de données évaluées par les pairs et des avertissements de Santé Canada selon lesquels ces colliers présentent des risques de strangulation et d’aspiration. Aucun rapport publié jusqu’à maintenant ne fait état de cas de strangulation liés à l’utilisation de colliers d’ambre pour dentition. Toutefois sera décrit ici un cas de strangulation non mortelle chez un nourrisson dès la première utilisation d’un collier d’ambre pour dentition. Il sera également question du rôle des médecins comme défenseurs des enfants dans la déclaration de cas semblables et dans l’éducation des familles. Enfin, les auteurs discuteront de la responsabilité de tous les professionnels et de toutes les organisations professionnelles voués au bien-être des nourrissons et des tout-petits dans la défense des intérêts des enfants en exprimant des préoccupations et en informant les parents.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence to: Katrina Hurley, Department of Emergency Medicine, IWK Health Centre, 5850/5980 University Avenue, PO Box 9700, Halifax, NS, Canada B3K 6R8; Email: kfhurley@dal.ca

References

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Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine
  • ISSN: -
  • EISSN: 1481-8035
  • URL: /core/journals/canadian-journal-of-emergency-medicine
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